Posts Tagged: submissions

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Announcing Our BIG 2015-2016 Indiana Review News!

We’re busy in the Indiana Review offices this summer: Our 2015 1/2K Prize is currently open for your work under 500 words in any genre, and our new Summer 2015 issue was published only weeks ago. We’re also very happy to announce our three exciting new ventures and partnerships!

Indiana Review is thrilled to partner with the excellent Indiana University Press to start our Blue Light Books series, an annual Prize given on alternating years for a short story collection and a poetry collection. From December 1, 2015 to February 15, 2016 we will be accepting submissions of short story collections. The winner will receive $2,000, publication with IU Press, and be flown out to beautiful Bloomington, IN to read at our 2017 Blue Light Reading. This year the prize will be judged by Michael Martone. Read more…

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IU Press: Submit to Undeniably Indiana

Indiana University Press is celebrating the Indiana bicentennial in 2016 with a book that is as unique as our state. Next fall, Indiana University Press will publish Undeniably Indiana, a crowd-sourced book written by the people of Indiana for the state of Indiana.

Current and former Hoosier residents are invited to share offbeat, interesting, and unusual facts and stories about things that could only happen here.

Submissions will be accepted until Sept. 1 via the Undeniably Indiana Facebook page.


“Middle Space”: Call for Submissions!

AlphaTangoBravo/Adam Baker

Call for Indiana Review’s Special Themed Folio: MIDDLE SPACE

Bending the rules of craft is not a new thing. Bold steps and subtle transformations are how we move forward in literature, in society, and in ourselves. For a special folio in our Summer 2014 issue, we’re seeking work—in both form and content—that blurs genres and breaks down preconceptions, narratives of transgression that make us question our boundaries of what a literary work is and can do.

Keywords to consider and inspire: boundaries, borders, limits, edges, duality, on the verge, transformation, transgression, travel, movement, bodies, collapse, collage, correspondence, collaboration, middle space.

Click through for guidelines and deadlines!

Read more…

Dear Diary


I love the careful refinement and precision of a good manuscript. But sometimes, when I’m not attending to submissions or screening essays for publication, I just want to lie back, relax, and read someone else’s diary.

“Why do we read a writer’s journal?” Susan Sontag asks in her 1962 essay, “The Artist as Exemplary Sufferer.” Is it, she continues, “because it illuminates his books? Often it does not.”

More likely, Sontag says, we read a writer’s journal “simply because of the rawness of the journal form, even when it is written with an eye to future publication. Here we read the writer in the first person; we encounter the ego behind the masks of ego in an author’s works. No degree of intimacy in a novel can supply this.”

In a recent review of Sontag’s published journals, Rachel Luban suggests that Sontag always expected the eventual publication of her own notebooks and wrote in anticipation of being read. Luban says, “Given [Sontag’s] ambitions, she must have hoped they might one day reach a wider audience. Reading them, we are always looking at Sontag looking at us looking at her.” Read more…

Interview With 2012 Fiction Prize Winner: CB Anderson

As we enter the final weeks of the 2013 Fiction Contest, many writers are faced with the question: What does it take to win?

Because submitting work can feel a bit like fishing in the dark with your firstborn child as bait, we asked last year’s winner, CB Anderson, to say a few words about her creative process and to share a few strategies for success in short fiction.

Anderson’s prize-winning story “Mavak Tov” will soon be published in her collection River Talk. The book contains 17 stories — a combination of short and short-short fiction forthcoming from C&R Press in 2014 . Be sure to check it out!

In response to “Mavak Tov,” last year’s judge Dana Johnson writes:

This story haunted me. The main character’s longing and desire for comfort, for a place to be, is so powerful and recognizable, as is the conflict and question this story poses, not just for the main character but for all of us: At what price do we achieve comfort? At what point do we reject what is easy and familiar for something far more necessary, which is true agency and power? This essential question is explored through a beautifully rendered relationship between a mother and her daughter and between the wives of one polygamist man, in gorgeous, unflinching detail. Read more…