Posts By: Su Cho

Article Thumbnail

Announcing Our Special Folio: Metallic Grit Call for Submissions!

 Indiana Review will be accepting submissions of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction for General Submissions as well as our Metallic Grit themed folio starting on September 1, 2016. We are seeking work that addresses this theme and welcome all creative interpretations.

We think of Metallic Grit not only as a theme but also as a showcase of the enduring yet protean quality of writing. During times of change and uncertainty, it is crucial to remain resilient. We wonder about the raw materials that go into the creation of a metallic object or being. The process requires work and heat to arrive at its luster. There is a lasting grit when something undergoes such change. We call for work that will not only interrogate what creates something or someone resilient but also investigate this hybridity—its multifaceted nature.

Stun us with work that employs unforgettable form, language, character, landscape. Shock us with beauty without forgetting its grit.

SPECIAL FOLIO SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

General and Special Folio Submissions are open from SEPTEMBER 1 until OCTOBER 31 (MIDNIGHT EST). We will only accept submissions during this submission window.

There is a $3.00 reading fee for all non-subscribing submitters.

To be considered for publication in our Special Folio, please be sure to select “2016 FOLIO: Metallic Grit” when submitting.

You may only submit to ONE of the following: General Submissions or the Special Folio. 

Stories & Nonfiction: We consider prose of up to 8,000 words in length, and we prefer manuscripts that are double-spaced in 11- or 12-point font with numbered pages. Submissions should be formatted as .doc files. Translations are welcome.

Poems: Send only 3-6 poems per submission. Do not send more than 4 poems if longer than 3 pages each. Translations are welcome.

If you have been published in IR, please wait two years before submitting again.

All submitted work must be previously unpublished, which includes works posted to personal blogs, online journals or magazines, or any part of a thesis or dissertation that has been published electronically.

IR cannot consider work (other than book reviews, author interviews, or blog posts) from anyone currently or recently affiliated with Indiana University, which includes those who have studied at or worked for Indiana University within the past 4 years.

We look forward to reading your work! For complete guidelines, click here for our Submissions page.

Article Thumbnail

Listen to “His Father’s Wake” by Alicia Wright

“His Father’s Wake” by Alicia Wright will appear in 38.2 Winter 2016 issue. “His Father’s Wake” was the winner of the 2016 Poetry Prize selected by judge Camille Rankine.

Listen to her read “His Father’s Wake” here.

*

AliciaWright.IR

Originally from Georgia, Alicia Wright has received fellowships from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she recently earned her MFA. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The Literary Review, Prelude, The Southeast Review, and New South, where she was the winner of the 2015 New Writing Contest. She lives and teaches in Iowa City, Iowa.

 

Article Thumbnail

Microreview: Cori A. Winrock’s This Coalition of Bones

This Coalition of Bones by Cori A. Winrock (Kore Press, 2014)

When I read this collection, I was fascinated by the spine and its injuries. How perpetual pressure can force the spinal discs to wear away, how a rupture can seep into its surroundings—pinching nerves and birthing a relentless pain. Spinal discs are made to burden the daily compression and decompression caused by movement, but one instance of physical trauma or consistent strain can arrive at the same endpoint. This Coalition of Bones by Cori A. Winrock spoke to these themes, presented poems both compressing and decompressing in a motion filled with insistent musicality and unrelenting gentleness.

Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Interview with 2016 1/2K Prize Judge Aimee Nezhukumatathil

Our 2016 1/2K Prize Judge is Aimee Nezhukumatathil, author of many poetry collections such as Lucky Fish and of the upcoming collection of essays World of Wonder. In this interview, she discusses genre-blurring, some of her favorite animals, and what she might be looking for in the prize-winning entry.

*

nezhukumatathil_green

Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently, Lucky Fish.  She is the poetry editor of Orion magazine and her poems and essays have appeared in American Poetry Review, Brevity, Poetry, Tin House, and in The Best American Poetry series. She is a professor of English at The State University of New York at Fredonia, and in 2016-17, she will be the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi’s MFA program.
You can follow her on Twitter @aimeenez.

Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Listen to Raena Shirali read “tristesse”

 

Raena Shirali’s great poem “tristesse” appears in Indiana Review 38.1, Summer 2016 Ghost theme issue. In this Bluecast, we have chosen to feature the poem both as text and recording; we believe that it is an especially unique opportunity to experience both the sonic and textual qualities of this poem.

Listen to Raena read her poem here.

 

tristesse

girl with paisley hands sobs like a cherub. the courthouse has no lashes but we call it a person anyway. what we associate with smeared mascara. to say, “her expression was soft.” quiet girl children. mural on the elementary school wall of a single stick figure. smiling + looking down. looking like the girl you knew / saw on the news: missing: girl with training bra. girl with nude bra—nipples painted on. the question of breasts. her areolae goosebumped at your touch. girl with pot leaf for a mouth. every building shorter than the church steeples. sky fading gray to gray. how many men do not know where the girls have gone. something sticky, viscous on her glitter heels. heels not made to run from / in. tight leather & all that bullshit about straight teeth. take this woman to be especially not his in white, red, tell power how you really feel. tell him what she was wearing when you last saw her. communicate. you’re hysterical in your yellow room—a mind doesn’t just sail away. the sails on the horizon line look like a line of cocaine / you mean ghosts. you mean a line of cartoon girls in triangular dresses, just outlines floating up the coast—

 

*

raenashiraliheadshot

Indian American poet Raena Shirali grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, where she currently lives and teaches English at College of Charleston. Her first bookGILT, is forthcoming in 2016 with YesYes Books, and her work has appeared in Crazyhorse, Four Way Review, Indiana Review, Muzzle Magazine, Ninth Letter, Tupelo Quarterly, Pleiades, and many more. Her other honors include a 2016 Pushcart Prize, the 2016 Cosmonauts Avenue Prize, recognition as a finalist for the 2016 Tupelo Quarterly Poetry Prize, the 2014 Gulf Coast Poetry Prize, recognition as a finalist for the 2014 Ruth Lilly Fellowship, and a “Discovery” / Boston Review Poetry Prize in 2013. She will also be the Spring 2017 Philip Roth Resident at the Stadler Center for Poetry.