Posts By: Tessa Yang

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Futures Folio: Special Call for Submissions!

In addition to accepting works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction for General Submissions starting September 1, Indiana Review is calling for submissions to our FUTURES FOLIO.

As we celebrate the pieces that have shaped the journal over the past forty years, we don’t want to lose sight of where we—or our readers—are headed. For a special folio in our Summer 2018 issue, we’re calling for short stories, poems, and essays that invoke the questions of our varied futures. Send us your characters who daydream and doubt, your chronicles of advancement and collapse. Guide us through landscapes that are wholly strange, or uncannily familiar. Though post-apocalyptic narratives are welcome, ultimately we seek the keenest, freshest interpretations of the theme in whatever form or genre they might take.

FUTURES FOLIO SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

General and Special Folio Submissions are open from SEPTEMBER 1 until OCTOBER 31 (MIDNIGHT EST). We will only accept submissions during this submission window.

There is a $3.00 reading fee for all non-subscribing submitters.

To be considered for publication in our Special Folio, please be sure to select “FUTURES Folio – appropriate genre” when submitting.

You may only submit to ONE of the following: General Submissions or the Special Folio. 

Stories & Nonfiction: We consider prose of up to 8,000 words in length, and we prefer manuscripts that are double-spaced in 12-point font with numbered pages. Submissions should be formatted as .doc files.

Poems: Send only 3-6 poems per submission. Do not send more than 4 poems if longer than 3 pages each.

Translations: We welcome translations across genres. Please ensure you have the rights to the translated piece prior to submitting.

If you have been published in IR, please wait two years before submitting again.

All submitted work must be previously unpublished, which includes works posted to personal blogs, online journals or magazines, or any part of a thesis or dissertation that has been published electronically.

IR cannot consider work (other than book reviews, author interviews, or blog posts) from anyone currently or recently affiliated with Indiana University, which includes those who have studied at or worked for Indiana University within the past 4 years.

We look forward to reading your work! For complete guidelines, or to submit, please click here for our Submissions page.

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Listen to “The Flock” by Rachael Peckham

Last year, Aimee Nezhukumatathil selected “The Flock” by Rachael Peckham as the winner of the 2016 1/2 K Prize. Click here to listen to Rachael read her prose poem on the IR Bluecast as you prepare your submission to this year’s 1/2 K Prize!

“The Flock” appears in Indiana Review 39.1, which was published in May 2017.

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Rachael Peckham is an associate professor of English at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia, and the author of the chapbook Muck Fire: Prose Poems, which won the Robert Watson Award at Spring Garden Press.  In addition to winning the 1/2 K Prize at Indiana Review, she is the 2016 winner of the Orison Anthology Nonfiction Award and the Crab Orchard Review Special Feature Literary Nonfiction Award. Rachael is currently at work on a collection of lyric essays, The Aviatrix, about flight and trauma.

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Interview with 2017 1/2 K Prize Judge Donika Kelly

The 2017 1/2 K Prize is open June 15 through August 1! In this interview, prize judge Donika Kelly discusses bowerbirds and black bears, favorite authors, and what she might be looking for in a prize-winning submission.

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Donika Kelly’s debut collection, Bestiary (Graywolf Press 2016), was selected by Nikky Finney for the 2015 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, and long listed for the National Book Award. She holds an MFA in Writing from the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas at Austin, and in 2013, she received a Ph.D. in English from Vanderbilt University, where she specialized in American literature and film studies. Donika is a Cave Canem graduate fellow and a June Fellow of the Bucknell Seminar for Younger Poets. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in various journals including Tin House, Indiana Review, and Virginia Quarterly Review. Donika is an Assistant Professor at St. Bonaventure University, where she teaches creative writing.

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Spotlight on La.Lit: “In the hollow of your hands hides a heartbeat” by Pranaya Rana

Raman took his first photograph at the age of eight. Out of an oblong window in northern Kathmandu looking out on land that had turned to marsh in the monsoon rains, peopled with frogs and the young of mosquitoes. From the top left corner of the frame protruded the jagged edge of a tin roof and in the bottom right, a fat frog, resplendent green, sat on a solitary red brick rising from the waters like an island. In between, there were sharp blades of grass and the surface of the standing water, black with fine grainy mosquitoes.

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Announcing the 2017 Poetry Prize Winner!

We are excited to announce that the winner of the 2017 Poetry Prize is Kristen Steenbeeke for her poem “Apocalypse Dream Again.” Many thanks to everyone who submitted their work and made this year’s prize possible. “Apocalypse Dream Again” will appear in our Winter 2017 issue.

2017 Poetry Prize Winner:

“Apocalypse Dream Again” by Kristen Steenbeeke

Ross Gay says about the winning piece: “What a strange, unpredictable, veering, gale-tossed, silly, grave, many-registered, yearning, rackety poem this is.  And the phrase, “the sadness of a moonpie”!  I love that.  This is one of those poems that feels like a well-caffeinated friend who knocked on the door having picked some flowers for you on the way. “

Finalists

“Stand-In for a Ghost at a Séance” by Jessica Hincapie

“kindness” by Marlin M. Jenkins

“Offering to Azazel” by Alisha Kaplan

“A Mouth with Nothing to Say” by Peter LaBerge

“Diagram of the Human Ear” by Matthew Minicucci

“Inheritance” by Kirk Schlueter

“How to Marry the Land” by Nicole Stockburger

“The Funeral” by Jessica Lynn Suchon

“A family recipe that cannot be followed written down” by Tianru Wang