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2018 1/2 K Twitter Contest #IRGIF

 

Indiana Review’s 2018 1/2 K Prize opens July 1st along with our Twitter contest, “GIF Us What You Got!”  We’re looking for stories and poems, 280 characters or less, that can be supported by a related internet GIF to illustrate your work. Anything goes, so get GIF’n! Make sure to hashtag your tweet with #IRGIF. The contest is open until Tuesday, July 31st.

One GIF-savvy winner will receive a free submission to our 1/2 K Prize as well as a copy of Indiana Review’s 40.1 issue and Jennifer Givhan’s poetry collection Girl with Desk Mask.

Don’t forget to submit your 1/2 K piece by August 15th! Good Luck!

Illustration by Paul Blow

 

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40.1 SNEAK PEEK: AMERICA by NOMI STONE

SP_Stone_America

 

Nomi Stone’s second collection of poems, Kill Class, is forthcoming from Tupelo Press in 2019. Poems appear recently or will soon in The New Republic, The New England Review, Tin House, Bettering American Poetry 2017, The Best American Poetry 2016, Guernica, and elsewhere. Kill Class is based on two years of fieldwork she conducted within war trainings in mock Middle Eastern villages erected by the U.S. military across America.

 

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40.1 SNEAK PEEK: excerpt of WE ARE NOT SAINTS by BRENNA WOMER

SP_Womer_We Are Not Saints

 

Brenna Womer is an MFA candidate at Northern Michigan University where she teaches composition and literature and serves as an associate editor of Passages North. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Normal School, DIAGRAM, The Pinch, Hippocampus, Booth, and elsewhere. Her chapbook Atypical Cells of Undetermined Significance is forthcoming on C&R Press.

 

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40.1 SNEAK PEEK: from QUARANTYNE by JUSTIN PHILLIP REED

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Justin Phillip Reed was born and raised in South Carolina. His work has appeared in Best American Essays, Boston Review, Callaloo, The Kenyon Review, Obsidian, and elsewhere. Coffee House Press will release his first full-length poetry collection, Indecency, in spring 2018. Justin lives in St. Louis.