Article Thumbnail

Online Feature: “Remedies” by Talin Tahajian

You were the color of a dove & I don’t know what to do
about that. I have never understood how to cup my hands

& take communion. Like a faithful daughter, I carry this
with me. I stab it with feathers & pray until it is covered

in gems. I rinse it in the river that knows my blood, wring
it out beneath a full moon. I know nothing about bird calls.

I know nothing about meat. Bless the river & all the fish
we poisoned. Foreign fluids. Bless the red birches forced

to watch. I want to burn something, so I char the flesh
of a catfish & think of myself. Girl as carp. Small tragedy

with freshwater pearls. I baptize myself in this water
& I see myself float in this water. Somewhere, a flock

of crows & I don’t hear anything over the soft breath
of river fish as they touch me in places that don’t exist.

*

This poem appeared in Indiana Review 37.1, Summer 2015.

Emily Corwin (Poetry Editor): Talin Tahajian’s poetry is tender, melodic, and sensuous. I can never get enough of her writing, especially this poem—the way she explores faith through images of birds, water, fish. This poem sweeps me up like the river running through it. If you have not read Talin’s work, you definitely should—her poems are necessary and gorgeous and exactly what you need.

*

Talin Tahajian grew up near Boston. Her poetry has recently appeared in Kenyon Review Online, Indiana Review, Best New Poets 2014 & 2016, Salt Hill Journal, Passages North, Columbia Poetry Review, and Washington Square Review. She’s the author of two chapbooks, The smallest thing on Earth (Bloom Books, 2017) and Start with dead things (Midnight City Books, 2015), a split chapbook with Joshua Young. She edits poetry for the Adroit Journal and is currently a student at the University of Cambridge, where she studies English literature.

 

Article Thumbnail

Interview with 2017 Blue Light Reader Cathy Bowman

Poet and IU Professor of Creative Writing Cathy Bowman will be one of three readers at this year’s Blue Light Reading. Here she discusses the inspiration behind her Blue Light Workshop, “The Kitchen Session,” as well as her recent book Can I Finish Please? (Four Way Bookos 2016) and current creative projects.

*

CATHY BOWMAN is the author of several poetry collections, most recently Can I Finish Please? (Four Way Books in 2016.) Her writing has been awarded the Peregrine Smith Poetry Prize, the Kate Tufts Discovery Award for Poetry, a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Poetry, and four Yaddo Fellowships. She was the recipient of a faculty teaching award and the IU President’s Arts and Humanities Award. Her poems have appeared in many literary journals and anthologies, including Best American Poetry, Paris Review, TriQuarterly, and Kenyon Review.

Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Interview with 2017 Blue Light Reader Raena Shirali

Indiana Review is gearing up for our annual Blue Light Reading, where we have the honor of bringing to Bloomington three talented writers who will read from their work and conduct craft workshops open to all. We are thrilled to have Raena Shirali as one of our Blue Light readers this year. In the following interview, she discusses her just-released poetry collection GILT, poetic closure, and advice to writers at all stages.

*

Raena Shirali is the author of GILT (YesYes Books, 2017). Her poems & reviews have appeared in Blackbird, Ninth Letter, Crazyhorse, Indiana Review, Pleiades, Four Way Review, & elsewhere. She currently lives in Lewisburg, where she is the Philip Roth Resident at Bucknell University’s Stadler Center for Poetry, & serves as a poetry reader for Muzzle Magazine. Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Interview with 2016 Poetry Prize Winner Alicia Wright

Alicia Wright’s poem “His Father’s Wake” was chosen by Camille Rankine as the winner of the 2016 Poetry Prize!  “His Father’s Wake” appeared in IR 38.2. Do read on for insight, inspiration, and any tips she might have for current submitters to the 2017 Poetry Prize, deadline April 1st!

*

 

Alicia Wright is originally from Georgia and has received fellowships from the Iowa Writers Workshop. Poems appear in The Literary Review, Southern Humanities Review, The Southeast Review, and New South as the winner of their 2015 New Writing Contest, among others. At present, she lives and teaches in Iowa City, and this fall she will begin a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Denver.

Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Online Feature: “The Head Bodyguard Holds His Head in His Hands” by Lincoln Michel

When the Dictator settles on a day of shopping, the head bodyguard notifies the store twenty minutes in advance. In this way, assassination plots are eluded. The Dictator arrives in a black limousine along with his four favorite bodyguards. The head bodyguard sits in the front seat and lazily scans the tops of buildings for any glints that might signify a sniper rifle or bazooka. The Dictator reclines in the backseat between two of the other bodyguards—two brothers, in fact—and sips a small cup of single malt Scotch and water. Sometimes he will substitute the Scotch for an obscure brand of grape soda he has consumed since childhood, although only if the Dictator thinks that the bodyguards will not be able to guess the contents of his drink. This is why the Dictator only drinks from black mugs.
Read more…