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Interview with 2015 1/2 K Prize Finalist Felicia Zamora

2015 1/2 K Prize Finalist, Felicia Zamora, answers our much anticipated questions about her poem “Decoy” and her overall experiences as a writer. In this interview, she dives in and elaborates on what inspired this piece and gives advice to writers submitting to our ongoing 2016 1/2 K Prize.

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FelicFeliciaZamora7-2-16ia Zamora is the author of the book Of Form & Gather, winner of the 2016 Andrés Montoya Poetry Prize from University of Notre Dame Press. She won the 2015 Tomaž Šalamun Prize from Verse, and authored the chapbooks Imbibe {et alia} here (Dancing Girl Press 2016) and Moby-Dick Made Me Do It (2010). Her published works may be found or forthcoming in Bellevue Literary Review, Columbia Poetry Review, Crazyhorse, Cutbank, Hotel Amerika, Indiana Review, Meridian, North American Review, Phoebe, Pleiades, Poetry Daily, Poetry Northwest, Puerto del Sol, Salt Hill, Tarpaulin Sky Magazine, The Adirondack Review; The Burnside Review, The Cincinnati Review, The Michigan Quarterly, The Normal School, TriQuarterly Review, Verse Daily, Witness Magazine, West Branch, and others. She is an associate poetry editor for the Colorado Review and holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Colorado State University. She lives in Colorado with her partner, Chris, and their two dogs, Howser and Lorca.

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2016 1/2K TWITTER CONTEST!!!

The IR 1/2 K Prize champions the art of concision, as we consider work of any genre of 500 words or less. This Twitter contest highlights the importance of concision by turning the tables. For ages, authors have mastered this art by capturing the essence of their work in a few short words: the title.

For this contest we want you to unspool titles of works of fiction or poetry. Make a pun on the original title, ruin a book for others with too much information: the power is yours. Be sure to hashtag the title of the work you’re spoofing along with #IRHalfK. Entries are due by Monday, August 1, 12 PM EST.

Example Tweets:

  • The wonderful, magnificent, rich man who after an identity crisis and a name change comes to be known as Gatsby #Gatsby #IRHalfK
  • Baby gets attacked by evil wizard but all he has to show for it is a weirdly specific scar and dead parents #HarryPotter #IRHalfK
  • Don’t even bother reading these, everyone is dead #GOT #IRHalfK

One lucky (and clever) winner will receive a free entry into our 2016 1/2K Prize and an IR Prize Pack. Our favorite runner-ups will also receive an IR Prize pack and, most importantly, winners will be glorified forever in our blog posts and on our twitter page.

Happy spoofing to you all and don’t forget to showcase your talents further by entering our 1/2K Prize!

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Microreview: Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib’s The Crown Ain’t Worth Much

The Crown Ain’t Worth Much by Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib (Button Poetry, 2016)

I don’t want to imagine how many strangled nights Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib spent thrashing inside the belly of death to give us The Crown Ain’t Worth Much, but I am immensely grateful he survived them with a soul as expansive and rich as found in this debut collection of poetry. This collection carries a fierce duende, a juggernaut unafraid to tie your body “to a truck in east texas” and drag it “through that jagged metal holy land so you can meet god clean”. The Crown Ain’t Worth Much is not so much a book you read, but one you survive—with Willis-Abdurraqib’s compassionate, elegiac lyric gently pushing you forward through heartbreak and violence.

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Ross Gay Reads “His Father’s Wake” by Alicia Wright

As part of the 2016 Poetry Prize winner package, Ross Gay reads Alicia Wright’s winning poem “His Father’s Wake” on our Bluecast here. 

Here’s what judge Camille Rankine says about the winning poem: “What strikes me first about ‘His Father’s Wake’ is the unmoored energy of it. The phrases drift and crash into one another. They collide, they ricochet and spin away. These movements make a voice that is both wild and deliberate, steady and reckless in turn. The effect is captivating. I feel each shift and slow and quickening in my breath, in my heart’s beat.”

Listen to Alicia Wright read her poem here.

 

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Announcing Our Special Folio: Metallic Grit Call for Submissions!

 Indiana Review will be accepting submissions of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction for General Submissions as well as our Metallic Grit themed folio starting on September 1, 2016. We are seeking work that addresses this theme and welcome all creative interpretations.

We think of Metallic Grit not only as a theme but also as a showcase of the enduring yet protean quality of writing. During times of change and uncertainty, it is crucial to remain resilient. We wonder about the raw materials that go into the creation of a metallic object or being. The process requires work and heat to arrive at its luster. There is a lasting grit when something undergoes such change. We call for work that will not only interrogate what creates something or someone resilient but also investigate this hybridity—its multifaceted nature.

Stun us with work that employs unforgettable form, language, character, landscape. Shock us with beauty without forgetting its grit.

SPECIAL FOLIO SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

General and Special Folio Submissions are open from SEPTEMBER 1 until OCTOBER 31 (MIDNIGHT EST). We will only accept submissions during this submission window.

There is a $3.00 reading fee for all non-subscribing submitters.

To be considered for publication in our Special Folio, please be sure to select “2016 FOLIO: Metallic Grit” when submitting.

You may only submit to ONE of the following: General Submissions or the Special Folio. 

Stories & Nonfiction: We consider prose of up to 8,000 words in length, and we prefer manuscripts that are double-spaced in 11- or 12-point font with numbered pages. Submissions should be formatted as .doc files. Translations are welcome.

Poems: Send only 3-6 poems per submission. Do not send more than 4 poems if longer than 3 pages each. Translations are welcome.

If you have been published in IR, please wait two years before submitting again.

All submitted work must be previously unpublished, which includes works posted to personal blogs, online journals or magazines, or any part of a thesis or dissertation that has been published electronically.

IR cannot consider work (other than book reviews, author interviews, or blog posts) from anyone currently or recently affiliated with Indiana University, which includes those who have studied at or worked for Indiana University within the past 4 years.

We look forward to reading your work! For complete guidelines, click here for our Submissions page.