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Interview with 2015 Fiction Prize Winner Simon Han

Our 2016 Fiction Prize is open until October 31! While you’re preparing to submit, read our interview with 2015 winner, Simon Han, selected by Laura van den Berg. Here, he discusses his winning story, “Be Tanly,” the short story writers who inspire him, his current project, and advice for 2015 Fiction Prize entrants. Simon’s story will appear in our 38.2 Winter 2016 issue.

Simon Han was born in Tianjin, China, and
grew up in Dallas. His stories have appeared or will appear in Guernica, West Branch, Narrative, and The Texas Observer. He received his MFA from Vanderbilt University and will begin a 2017-2018 Tulsa Artist Fellowship in January.

 

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Indiana Review Online: an Undergraduate Project

Lost or Found: 2016 Indiana Review Online Undergraduate Issue

Calling all current undergraduate student writers!

The second issue of Indiana Review Online: An Undergraduate Project is on its way–and this time, we are “Lost or Found”! Indiana Review and Indiana University-Bloomington’s Literary Editing & Publishing class have paired up to create the second issue of IR’s undergrad online literary magazine. Composed, edited, and published by undergraduates, we are lucky to be able to work with staff at Indiana University as well Indiana Review in order to create an online space where undergraduates from around the country can share their writing.

The theme for this issue is “Lost or Found”. We encourage writing that looks beyond the literal interpretation of this theme. Although we welcome works illustrating a “lost cause” or imagining an instance where you “find” a new purpose in life, stories or poems featuring lost keys, lost loved ones, and newly discovered taco trucks, don’t hesitate to send us work that pushes the boundaries of what loss or finding can mean, both in form and substance. Please send us work that puts us at a loss for words!

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Metallic Grit: Call for Essays on Craft

As you may know, we are currently reading for the Metallic Grit Special Folio. We think of Metallic Grit as representative of the lasting grit whenever intense work and heat are applied in the creation of a metallic object or being. We believe in this hybridity of writing and want to see your interpretation not only through stories and poems but through craft essays. Show us how writing is resilient, how writing matters not only to you but to the world.

This call for essays on craft and writing as resilience will only be valid for this submission period, deadline October 31st Midnight EST. Please be sure to follow the link here to make your submission.

We look forward to reading your work!

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IR Fiction Prize 2016 Twitter Contest!!! #IRrewind

Remember watching VHS tapes rewind? Like when Jack and Rose are alone in freezing waters but are saved by the magically appearing Titanic, which bursts up from the bottom of the sea only to take them back to Southampton. Or like watching the truce between the Montagues and Capulets slowly break apart by the spontaneous re-animations of Romeo and Juliet.

This time, we at Indiana Review are asking for you to not only reverse a story, but also do it in under 140 characters. Take a classic tale and tweet it from finish to start. Remember to always hashtag the title of the work as well as the official hashtag #IRrewind.

Some Examples:

“The story of a jaded boy who leaves his family to go to college and join the fencing team #CatcherintheRye #IRrewind”

 

“A scientist buries different body parts in the cemetery and they all grow into people who live happy lives #Frankenstein #IRrewind”

 

“A teenage wizard is robbed of his magical talent until he must resign himself to living under a family’s stairs #HarryPotter #IRrewind”

 

After the deadline, October 17 @ 12 PM EST, the IR team will pick out our one, favorite rewind, the writer of which will receive free entry into the 2016 Fiction Prize and an IR Prize Pack. While there will only be one winner, we will also be awarding several runner-ups IR Prize Packs as well. This will include the glorious privilege of being re-tweeted and mentioned in future blog posts from Indiana Review.

 

If you aren’t a 90’s kid and can’t remember how to rewind, you can always submit to general submissions or to the 2016 Fiction Prize, judged by the wonderful Aimee Bender! More information can be found on our website: https://indianareview.org/contests/

 

Good luck and remember to be kind and rewind!

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Announcing Our 2016 Half K Prize Winner

We are excited to announce that judge Aimee Nezhukumatathil has selected “The Flock” by Rachael Peckham as the winner of Indiana Review’s 2016 Half K Prize! Thank you to everyone who submitted their work and made this year’s prize possible. “The Flock” will appear in our Summer 2017 issue.

2016 Half K Prize Winner:

“The Flock” by Rachael Peckham

Aimee Nezhukumatathil says about the winning piece: “‘The Flock’ teaches us how to write tenderness, how to write with restraint and breath joined with tension and elegy. I thought about this piece and others for weeks as I carefully considered the supremely talented finalists, but this is the one I couldn’t shake off. And I realized: I don’t want to. I want to always recall this intimate portrait of an inquiry, its beautiful coil into the past.”

Runners-up

“Us, at Kroger” by Claire Luchette

“Weathering” by Brenda Peynado

Finalists

“Harriet’s Fall” by Jenny Fleming

“Minnesota Child would like to scream why she can’t play Paul Bunyan” by Ash Goedker

“Adoration of the J Girls” by Rochelle Hurt

“The Orchid” by John William McConnell

“It’s a Long Way to Empty” by Mary Mullen

“Esme” by Julia Strayer

“Ode to Phantoms” by Khaty Xiong