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Online Feature: “Doom is the House without the Door” by Jennifer Chang

More than once you wanted me to die.
I kicked the door until its hinges popped.

I collapsed in particle board dust.
I am a sort of door: I know how to swing open

and slam shut. I know how to lock.
You want the house. You want the last crumb

of soul I have left, but I don’t die. I don’t have a body.
I have an elm, fracturing limb by furious limb.

Our tornado summer. My weekly storm,
the heretic assailing the saint.

To swing open: 98º in the barn shade.
To slam shut: you sleep through my glory,

this dawn-constructed confession. To lock:
I do not know. I do not know how

to fill the smallest rooms. Once the sky
could forestall the revelation of the future,

but now I am an orchard forsaken. Ardent.
Ungovernable. Dead branch, fruitlessness, reach

for what I cannot. Not who you were or are,
but who you wanted to be. A wise thing

growing wiser. Ageless heart. To want
was the first survival. To be, the last.


This poem appeared in Indiana Review 34.2, Winter 2012. 

Emily Corwin (Poetry Editor):  “Doom Is the House without the Door” gorgeously navigates the dissolve of a relationship and its aftermath. Like the repeated imagery of doors in the poem, Chang’s speaker hinges and stops, back and forth, ever reeling towards this feeling of disaster, loss, a storm to be survived.


Jennifer Chang is the author of two books of poetry, The History jennifer-changof Anonymity and Some Say the Lark, which will be published by Alice James Books in October 2017. Her recent work has appeared in American Poetry Review, A Public Space, Orion, Narrative, and Poetry. She is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at George Washington University and lives in Washington, DC.

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Interview with 2015 Fiction Prize Winner Simon Han

Our 2016 Fiction Prize is open until October 31! While you’re preparing to submit, read our interview with 2015 winner, Simon Han, selected by Laura van den Berg. Here, he discusses his winning story, “Be Tanly,” the short story writers who inspire him, his current project, and advice for 2015 Fiction Prize entrants. Simon’s story will appear in our 38.2 Winter 2016 issue.

Simon Han was born in Tianjin, China, and
grew up in Dallas. His stories have appeared or will appear in Guernica, West Branch, Narrative, and The Texas Observer. He received his MFA from Vanderbilt University and will begin a 2017-2018 Tulsa Artist Fellowship in January.


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Indiana Review Online: an Undergraduate Project

Lost or Found: 2016 Indiana Review Online Undergraduate Issue

Calling all current undergraduate student writers!


The second issue of Indiana Review Online: An Undergraduate Project is on its way–and this time, we are “Lost or Found!” Indiana Review and Indiana University-Bloomington’s Literary Editing & Publishing class have paired up to create the second issue of IR’s undergrad online literary magazine. Composed, edited, and published by undergraduates, we are lucky to be able to work with staff at Indiana University as well at Indiana Review to create an online space where undergraduates from around the world can share their writing.

The theme for this issue is “Lost or Found”. We encourage writing that looks beyond the literal interpretation of this theme. We welcome works about loss, ranging from keys to loved ones, or about discovery, whether taco trucks or “a new purpose” in life. However do not hesitate to send us work that pushes the boundaries of what lost or finding can mean, both in form and substance. Please send us work that puts us at a loss for words!

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Metallic Grit: Call for Essays on Craft

As you may know, we are currently reading for the Metallic Grit Special Folio. We think of Metallic Grit as representative of the lasting grit whenever intense work and heat are applied in the creation of a metallic object or being. We believe in this hybridity of writing and want to see your interpretation not only through stories and poems but through craft essays. Show us how writing is resilient, how writing matters not only to you but to the world.

This call for essays on craft and writing as resilience will only be valid for this submission period, deadline October 31st Midnight EST. Please be sure to follow the link here to make your submission.

We look forward to reading your work!