The Larkin’s, the Robbins, and Me

The trees are coming into leaf

Like something almost being said

So wrote Philip Larkin, in seemingly his sunniest moment. Here in Bloomington, however, the trees have exploded into electric green like expletives shouted from the courthouse dome. And here at Indiana Review, even more seasonal shake-ups are underway.

Last year is dead, they seem to say

Jennifer Luebbers has assumed the throne of senior editor, as the esteemed Deborah Kim moves on to greener pastures. But never fear, we couldn’t let the woman responsible for IR achievements like this gorgeous website go too far: Ms. Kim remains a consulting editor. (I can hear her applauding my mixed metaphors from here.)

Begin afresh, afresh, afresh

It’s true, Phil, you glorious grump: The 2012-13 IR editorial board might just be the a-freshest lineup to date. But more on/from my colleagues in future posts. Who exactly am I?

Some fun facts and shameless self-promotion:

  • Previously worked as a popular music critic, and now DJs at south central Indiana’s best community radio station (Wednesday mornings at
  • Traveled independently on six continents (Antarctica, I’m gunning for you).
  • St. Louis Cardinals fan. That is all.

What exactly do I hope to do?

As Indiana Review‘s new Associate Editor, I seek to publish work of the highest quality that moves and risks — be it sentimentality or bad jokes (see above) — and emerges with a new and honest posture. To quote my other spirit guide, Tom Robbins, in Still Life With Woodpecker, I’m looking for:

“Something more than words…Crystals. I want to send my readers armloads of crystals, some of which are the color of orchids and peonies, some of which pick up radio signals from a secret city that is half Paris and half Coney Island.”

I look forward to reading your work and continuing Indiana Review‘s long tradition of excellence.

If this typewriter can’t do it, then fuck it, it can’t be done,

Katie Moulton

1/2 K Prize Deadline Extended & Other News


Hey! Great news: there’s still time to enter Indiana Review‘s 2012 1/2 K Prize! Our new deadline is now Friday, June 8th. If you haven’t already done so, now if your opportunity to send us your prose poems and short-shorts and flash-fictions.  Michael Martone is our judge; the entries are read and judged blind, and the winner will receive a $1000 honorarium and publication in Indiana Review. Click here for contest guidelines.

Finally, remember that we will be closing all general submissions tonight, May 31st, at midnight (EST). Submissions will reopen on August 1st.

In the meantime, stay tuned for more blog posts, summer reading lists, and updates from past IR contributors—all coming soon!

“You Don’t Have to Take My Word for It”: IR 34.1 Hits the Shelves

Dear Readers,

I’ve never given birth, but I imagine it might be something like the production of a literary journal. After about nine months of hard work and sweating and weeping and bleeding (paper cuts can be painful), we are at last blessed with the new sleek, shiny new issue that we can hold close and cherish.

My mom will be the first to point out that it is probably nothing at all like childbirth; she will also be quick to remind me that an average human gestation period is, in reality, thirty-eight weeks ( and is often longer). She’s probably also the first one to read this post (Hi, mom!).

Perhaps the larger discrepancy, though, is the fact the birth of a journal is a completely collective effort, and could never have happened without the dedication and commitment of all our readers, interns, editorial staff, office staff, contributors, contest judge, typesetter, printer, distributor, and, of course, you, our readers!

So, however inapt the birth metaphor may be, we are very proud to announce the arrival of a beautiful ~1 lb. issue of Indiana Review, filled with fresh and exciting poems, stories, and essays.

If you are a subscriber, keep a lookout for your issue to arrive in the mail. If you are not a subscriber, but want to be, or if you would like to order a single-issue copy, you can do so here.

I could say so much more about the issue, here, but I’ll keep this short and sweet. Instead, I’ll leave you with the words of one LeVar Burton, who said it best when he said, “You don’t have to take my word for it.”

Thank you so much for supporting Indiana Review. We are truly grateful for your support. We could not exist without you!



PS We are always interested in knowing what you think. Feel free to comment  below, or send us an email at We can’t wait to hear from you!


Summer Break-ing Away

Still from the film Breaking Away

It’s summer in Bloomington! While not *all* IR editorial meetings take place at the quarries (see above), this season comes with a to-do list more rigorous than Dennis Quaid’s late-’70s ab workouts (again, see above). What does that mean for you?

Regular submissions will be CLOSED, starting May 31. Submissions will re-open August 1, 2012. Any electronic or hard-copy submissions received between May 31 and July 31 will be returned unread.

But wait!

Do you have your own “Little 500” — a story of 500 words or fewer — looking for a venue? Submit to our “1/2 K” Prize, judged by Michael Martone! Postmark deadline is June 1, 2012. Submission guidelines can be found here.

Stay tuned to the blog for updates on more goings-on at Indiana Review. Ciao!

Announcing Our 2012 Poetry Prize Winner & Runners-Up!

2012 Indiana Review Poetry Prize Winner

“The Sublime”

Joshua Gottlieb-Miller

Houston, TX



Missy-Marie Montgomery

Springfield, MA

“Visiting Seattle”

Hannah Oberman-Breindel

Madison, WI

A big congratulations to Joshua Gottlieb-Miller, the winner of IR’s 2012 Poetry Prize, and our runners-up, Missy-Marie Montgomery and Hannah Oberman-Breindel!

“The Sublime” will appear in Indiana Review issue 34.2, due out this winter. Of the winning poem, Dean Young, our final judge, writes, “A beguiling and ambitious poem, ‘The Sublime’ combines a meditative calm with an imaginative sprawl to give a sharp and poignant sense of the instability and absurdity of this dear life.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

Many thanks to all who participated. Your support helped make this year’s Indiana Review Poetry Prize a success!