Award-Winning IU MFA 3rd-Year Reading

IU’s graduating MFA class of 2012 concluded their time here with several wonderful nights of thesis readings. Congrats to the readers for all of their achievements!

Pictured: readings by Pablo and Bethany; the cast of the IU MFA Reality Show accepts their awards for Bests and Mosts

Inside IR: Meet the Editors

This week, we finally hear from our marvelous Nonfiction Editor, Sarah Suksiri, who shares with us her delight for innovative nonfiction.

Where is home?

A little suburb in the Silicon Valley where there is plenty of good Vietnamese food and rush hour traffic.

Favorite issue of IR?

Our Winter 2011 issue. It has a good haul of nonfiction writers — possibly the most IR has ever published!

Tell us about what you’re reading right now.

I’m reading Scott Russell Sanders’ latest collection of essays, Earth Works, which I have to put down between every other essay because it makes me want to go for long walks.

What are you excited to see in nonfiction?

I get excited about creative and journalistic nonfiction exhibited in elegant, accessible online forms that do the work justice, like Wave CompositionThe Junketand The New Inquiry, or even blogs as a form of creative nonfiction, fused beautifully with other multimedia, like Ian Coyle’s Edits. I’m excited that there seems to be a very hungry audience for nonfiction, and that there are so many people who want to participate in other people’s experiences by reading about them. I’m also excited  for our new Nonfiction Editor, Mal Hellman, to take the reins and make IR nonfiction even better.

Dating Around

Image: typeconnection.com

Last September, our super design-savvy Editor, Deborah Kim, blogged about why the font you choose to use matters  in the submission process. Last week, however, I stumbled upon typeconnection, a website that is home to “A Typographic Dating Game.” The concept is basically the same as online dating—you select the font you’re most “attracted” to, and then you’re given several new fonts that you might like based on your previous selection. You check out pics of those fonts, read their bios, and then, if you fancy, you send the new font and the original font on a “date.” You’ll be told whether or not these fonts are compatible together.

While I’m a Garamond gal myself, I can’t pretend I wasn’t intrigued by the concept. Was I missing an opportunity? Was there a font out there for me?

Well, after exercising extreme care in a decision-making process that took the better part of my workday (sorry, Deb!), it turns out the two fonts I sent on a date weren’t compatible. Maybe Garamond and I are doing just fine on our own.

What about you, dear readers? Do you think a font has the power to alter the way you perceive a piece of writing? How so? We’d love to know your thoughts!

 

So What’s with the “Blue Light”?

Indiana Review will have its Second Annual Blue Light Reading this Friday, March 30th at 8pm at the Bloomington Playwrights Project. Check out Associate Editor Jennifer Luebber’s post “Announcing Indiana Review’s 2nd Annual Blue Light Reading” for more information.

The reading is sure to be intellectually AND emotionally stimulating (and, of course, fun!), but where the heck did the name come from? It turns out that the answer is very simple and has nothing to do with Kmart’s blue light specials: there’s a blue light in the Indiana Review office.

“Challenged”

Even if you’re familiar with IR, chances are you may have never visited the actual office. We are located on the 4th floor, which contains two long hallways extending in opposite directions. Our lovely office is located at the very end of one of these very long hallways. Now, to get to the 4th floor, you can choose from three different staircases (the major calf-burning exercise of my day) or you can take the elevator. One staircase puts you right outside our door, while another puts you on the other far end of the floor. The remaining staircase and elevator get you to the exact middle. So imagine that you’ve just made this trek up to the 4th floor and now you need to walk all the way down the hallway. The problem is, because there are several editors and interns coming and going according to individual class schedules, our office hours are not consistent from day to day, let alone from semester to semester. So there’s a chance that you walk all the way down the hall and the office is closed. Disappointment galore!

As a solution, we have a small desk lamp, with a bright blue light that shines down the hall. Think about it as a beacon of hope to help people find us, or a neon “OPEN” sign. Over the years, as a result of literary types working in close quarters with each other, the lamp has become a true member of the magazine. In honor of the Second Annual Blue Light Reading, I delved into the IR archives to bring you the best and the brightest of our blue light’s moments.

“Trick or Treat”

“Startled”

“Strong”

“Awed”

“Vain”

“Teased”

“Young, Blue, and Fabulous”

Spring Has Sprung, So Has Young

The deadline for our 2012 Poetry Prize with guest judge Dean Young is fast approaching! Make sure you get your submission in by midnight (or postmarked) on Saturday, March 31st. There’s no going wrong with this entry–for $20 you have a chance to win $1000 in our prize, appear in our next issue (even if you don’t win, your work is still considered!) and get a subscription to the one and only Indiana Review.

You can find submission details here. We can’t wait to read your work!

A graduate of our MFA program here at Indiana University, Dean Young released his most recent collection of poems titled Fall Higher. His numerous books of poetry include Elegy on Toy Piano (2005), a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and Skid (2002), a finalist for the Lenore Marshall Prize He has received a Stegner fellowship from Stanford University, as well as fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Young’s awards also include an Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His poems have appeared seven times in The Best American Poetry series. Young has taught at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, in the low-residency M.F.A. program at Warren Wilson College, and at Loyola University, in Chicago. He is currently the William Livingston Chair of Poetry at the University of Texas, in Austin.

 Photo courtesy the Poetry Foundation