1/2 K Prize Deadline Extended & Other News

Image: deviantart.com

Hey! Great news: there’s still time to enter Indiana Review‘s 2012 1/2 K Prize! Our new deadline is now Friday, June 8th. If you haven’t already done so, now if your opportunity to send us your prose poems and short-shorts and flash-fictions.  Michael Martone is our judge; the entries are read and judged blind, and the winner will receive a $1000 honorarium and publication in Indiana Review. Click here for contest guidelines.

Finally, remember that we will be closing all general submissions tonight, May 31st, at midnight (EST). Submissions will reopen on August 1st.

In the meantime, stay tuned for more blog posts, summer reading lists, and updates from past IR contributors—all coming soon!

“You Don’t Have to Take My Word for It”: IR 34.1 Hits the Shelves

Dear Readers,

I’ve never given birth, but I imagine it might be something like the production of a literary journal. After about nine months of hard work and sweating and weeping and bleeding (paper cuts can be painful), we are at last blessed with the new sleek, shiny new issue that we can hold close and cherish.

My mom will be the first to point out that it is probably nothing at all like childbirth; she will also be quick to remind me that an average human gestation period is, in reality, thirty-eight weeks ( and is often longer). She’s probably also the first one to read this post (Hi, mom!).

Perhaps the larger discrepancy, though, is the fact the birth of a journal is a completely collective effort, and could never have happened without the dedication and commitment of all our readers, interns, editorial staff, office staff, contributors, contest judge, typesetter, printer, distributor, and, of course, you, our readers!

So, however inapt the birth metaphor may be, we are very proud to announce the arrival of a beautiful ~1 lb. issue of Indiana Review, filled with fresh and exciting poems, stories, and essays.

If you are a subscriber, keep a lookout for your issue to arrive in the mail. If you are not a subscriber, but want to be, or if you would like to order a single-issue copy, you can do so here.

I could say so much more about the issue, here, but I’ll keep this short and sweet. Instead, I’ll leave you with the words of one LeVar Burton, who said it best when he said, “You don’t have to take my word for it.”

Thank you so much for supporting Indiana Review. We are truly grateful for your support. We could not exist without you!

Sincerely,

Jennifer

PS We are always interested in knowing what you think. Feel free to comment  below, or send us an email at inreview@indiana.edu. We can’t wait to hear from you!

 

Summer Break-ing Away

Still from the film Breaking Away

It’s summer in Bloomington! While not *all* IR editorial meetings take place at the quarries (see above), this season comes with a to-do list more rigorous than Dennis Quaid’s late-’70s ab workouts (again, see above). What does that mean for you?

Regular submissions will be CLOSED, starting May 31. Submissions will re-open August 1, 2012. Any electronic or hard-copy submissions received between May 31 and July 31 will be returned unread.

But wait!

Do you have your own “Little 500” — a story of 500 words or fewer — looking for a venue? Submit to our “1/2 K” Prize, judged by Michael Martone! Postmark deadline is June 1, 2012. Submission guidelines can be found here.

Stay tuned to the blog for updates on more goings-on at Indiana Review. Ciao!

Announcing Our 2012 Poetry Prize Winner & Runners-Up!

2012 Indiana Review Poetry Prize Winner

“The Sublime”

Joshua Gottlieb-Miller

Houston, TX

Runners-Up

“Mulberries”

Missy-Marie Montgomery

Springfield, MA

“Visiting Seattle”

Hannah Oberman-Breindel

Madison, WI

A big congratulations to Joshua Gottlieb-Miller, the winner of IR’s 2012 Poetry Prize, and our runners-up, Missy-Marie Montgomery and Hannah Oberman-Breindel!

“The Sublime” will appear in Indiana Review issue 34.2, due out this winter. Of the winning poem, Dean Young, our final judge, writes, “A beguiling and ambitious poem, ‘The Sublime’ combines a meditative calm with an imaginative sprawl to give a sharp and poignant sense of the instability and absurdity of this dear life.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.

Many thanks to all who participated. Your support helped make this year’s Indiana Review Poetry Prize a success!

“New writers to shake us and take us out to sea”

I’d like to introduce you to IR‘s dynamite new staff: Jennifer Luebbers takes the helm as Editor, and Katie Moulton is Associate Editor, Joe Hiland is Fiction Editor, Michael Mlekoday is Poetry Editor, Justin Wolfe is Nonfiction Editor, and Doug Paul Case is our first-ever Web Editor. I’m sad to leave my post, but I’m absolutely thrilled about the incoming team. I can’t wait to see what’s next for IR—it’s going to be a phenomenal year.

 

1. Why are literary journals significant?

MM: Tons of reasons! Literary journals are the vanguards of literature—they are where readers and writers first meet up, where our community comes together. Without journals, we’re just a bunch of rugged individualists, carrying only our own poems and stories and essays with us. Then we’re just landlocked, because it takes more than one branch to build a boat. Is that true? I don’t know. The great variety of journals being made and read right now means we can always find new inspiration, new writers to shake us and take us out to sea.

JW: I don’t know.  In historical terms, I can understand their importance, but in terms of right now, I’m really not actually sure?  I know that, in my experience, IR has been an important center to our literary community in Bloomington, but outside of that, I can’t say much else.  I’m sure former and future editors will be able to mount a rousing case for the continued cultural relevance of the literary journal, but I come from a blogging background and have, since I’ve been familiar with them, been resistant to what I perceive as the insularity of little magazines, the walled garden effect.  One of the reasons that I’ve taken this position is to try to break down or at least inform that resistance of mine, to better understand what a magazine like IR really does and what it means to our larger literary culture.  In other words: hopefully I’ll have a better answer this time next year?

DPC: Because they’re the future! It seems like everyone is bemoaning the death of literary journals, but while print might be fading, there are many, many online journals thriving and doing the same things literary magazines have always been doing: showing us the future of literature. Find me an important poet or story writer who wasn’t published first in a literary journal and I will buy you a cookie. If you’re interested in the trajectory of literature, you should be reading journals.

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