Posts Categorized: The Bluecast

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Listen to Raena Shirali read “tristesse”

 

Raena Shirali’s great poem “tristesse” appears in Indiana Review 38.1, Summer 2016 Ghost theme issue. In this Bluecast, we have chosen to feature the poem both as text and recording; we believe that it is an especially unique opportunity to experience both the sonic and textual qualities of this poem.

Listen to Raena read her poem here.

 

tristesse

girl with paisley hands sobs like a cherub. the courthouse has no lashes but we call it a person anyway. what we associate with smeared mascara. to say, “her expression was soft.” quiet girl children. mural on the elementary school wall of a single stick figure. smiling + looking down. looking like the girl you knew / saw on the news: missing: girl with training bra. girl with nude bra—nipples painted on. the question of breasts. her areolae goosebumped at your touch. girl with pot leaf for a mouth. every building shorter than the church steeples. sky fading gray to gray. how many men do not know where the girls have gone. something sticky, viscous on her glitter heels. heels not made to run from / in. tight leather & all that bullshit about straight teeth. take this woman to be especially not his in white, red, tell power how you really feel. tell him what she was wearing when you last saw her. communicate. you’re hysterical in your yellow room—a mind doesn’t just sail away. the sails on the horizon line look like a line of cocaine / you mean ghosts. you mean a line of cartoon girls in triangular dresses, just outlines floating up the coast—

 

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Indian American poet Raena Shirali grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, where she currently lives and teaches English at College of Charleston. Her first bookGILT, is forthcoming in 2016 with YesYes Books, and her work has appeared in Crazyhorse, Four Way Review, Indiana Review, Muzzle Magazine, Ninth Letter, Tupelo Quarterly, Pleiades, and many more. Her other honors include a 2016 Pushcart Prize, the 2016 Cosmonauts Avenue Prize, recognition as a finalist for the 2016 Tupelo Quarterly Poetry Prize, the 2014 Gulf Coast Poetry Prize, recognition as a finalist for the 2014 Ruth Lilly Fellowship, and a “Discovery” / Boston Review Poetry Prize in 2013. She will also be the Spring 2017 Philip Roth Resident at the Stadler Center for Poetry.   

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Listen to Sara Brickman Read “Poem for the Men Who Write Poems About Women’s Stories and Make Themselves Look Glorious In the Telling”

 

Sara Brickman’s great poem, “Poem for the Men Who Write Poems About Women’s Stories and Make Themselves Look Glorious In the Telling,” appears in our most recent issue, Indiana Review 37.2, Winter 2015.

Listen to Sara read her poem here.

Sara Brickman is an author, performer, and activist from Ann Arbor, MI.  eyes copyThe winner of the 2015 Split This Rock Poetry Prize, Sara has received grants from 4Culture, a Ken Warfel Fellowship for Poetry in Community, and a Lambda Literary Emerging Writer Fellowship. Recent work appears in Muzzle, Shift, The New, and the anthology Courage: Daring Poems for Gutsy Girls. Her manuscript was a finalist for the 2015 Pamet River Prize from Yes Yes Books. Sara lives and writes in Charlottesville, VA, where she is a Hoyns Fellow and MFA candidate in Poetry at the University of Virginia.

 

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Listen to Danielle Lazarin Read “Landscape No. 27”

Danielle Lazarin’s story, “Landscape No. 27,” appears in our Winter 2015 issue, Indiana Review 37.2.

Listen to Danielle read her story here.

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Danielle Lazarin’s fiction appears or is forthcoming in Colorado Review, Indiana Review, Glimmer Train, Boston Review, and elsewhere. She lives in her native New York City, where she is at work on a collection of short stories and a novel.

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Listen to Jim Whiteside Read “Century”

Jim Whiteside’s poem, “Century,” appears in our Winter 2015 issue, Indiana Review 37.2.

Listen to him read “Century” here.

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Jim Whiteside holds degrees from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Vanderbilt University. His poems appear or are forthcoming in The Southern Review, Kenyon Review Online, Ninth Letter, Post Road, and Forklift, Ohio, among others. Originally from Cookeville, Tennessee, he works as a barista and occasionally teaches in Greensboro, North Carolina.

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Listen to Megan Peak Read “The First Book”

 

Megan Peak’s poem, “The First Book,” appears in our Summer 2015 issue, Indiana Review 37.1.

Listen to her read ” The First Book” here.

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Megan Peak holds an M.F.A. from The Ohio State University. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in Blackbird, Cimarron Review, Iron Horse Literary Review, Linebreak, Muzzle, North American Review, Pleiades, Ploughshares, and Valparaiso Poetry Review. Her manuscript was a finalist in the 2015 Levis Prize in Poetry at Four Way Books.