Posts Categorized: Fiction

Article Thumbnail

Interview with 2015 Fiction Prize Judge Laura van den Berg

Our 2015 Fiction Prize Judge is Laura van den Berg, whose story “Where We Must Be” first appeared in Indiana Review 29.1 and was republished online at Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading. In this interview, she answers questions about her short story collection, The Isle of Youth, allergies to boredom, and what she might be looking for in the prize-winning entry.

LauraAuthorPhotoLaura van den Berg is the author of the novel Find Me and the story collections What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us and The Isle of Youth. She is the recent recipient of the Bard Fiction Prize, the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Jeannette Haien Ballard Writer’s Prize, and an O. Henry Award. She currently lives in Brooklyn, where she is at work on a new collection of stories and a novel.

 

Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Announcing Indiana Review Online: an Undergraduate Project!

Many members of our Indiana Review staff are fortunate enough to teach Introduction to Creative Writing as well as Poetry and Fiction writing courses here at Indiana University. We are even luckier to have a talented student body eagerly interested in both editing and submitting their own writing, and as instructors, we love to help get them involved to this end.

Indiana Review and Indiana University’s W280 Literary Editing and Publishing course have decided to team up and create a space for any currently enrolled undergraduate student to submit POETRY or SHORT FICTION (up to 5000 words) to us for consideration in our once-annual issue of Indiana Review Online: an Undergraduate Project. This inaugural issue will be published on Indiana Review’s website in January 2016 and will be wholly edited by undergraduate IU students enrolled in the course. Please see a complete list of submission guidelines below. Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Online Feature: “Sorry for Crashing Your Party and Possibly Killing Your Horse” by Elise Burke

 

I call Niles when I have a good amount of energy and feel sorry for myself. But he isn’t even fun enough to be distracting. When he comes on my stomach, he curses apologies and dabs at the pink scars, as if his little puddle hurts the spot where the tumor used to be. Who knows why he bothers pulling out, like it’s even possible for my body to support another person. At least for that one second he believes I’m a normal girl—one you can count on to be alive nine months later.

Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Interview with 2013 Fiction Prize Finalist: Lisa Beebe

lisabeebeWhile you’re waiting to hear the results of our 2014 Fiction Prize, or getting your essays ready for the November 15 opening date of our inaugural nonfiction contest, why not check our this interview with Lisa Beebe–the venerable finalist for our 2013 Fiction Prize–whose story, “Wildflowers,” appears in Indiana Review issue 36.1? Answered here are questions asked her about her piece, the benefits of being open to discovery, and using your phone to this end.

After your check out the interview, be sure to read “Wildflowers” online here.

Lisa Beebe lives in Los Angeles. Her work has appeared in Eleven Eleven, Pacific Review, Psychopomp and Switchback. Find her online at lisabeebe.com.

 

Read more…

Article Thumbnail

2013 Fiction Prize Finalist: “Wildflowers” by Lisa Beebe

“Wildflowers”

2013 Fiction Prize Finalist

I am tired of data, tired of spreadsheets, tired of life, but I have to be at work in forty-five minutes. Half awake, I put on my glasses, and notice something strange on my arm. Little spots. No, not spots. Strange dark hairs. No, not hairs either. My eyes focus. Plants are growing out of my skin.

“This can’t be good,” I say to myself. I don’t freak out, though. I’ve always been hairy. The little sprouts feel like a new kind of hair, another sign of getting older that I hadn’t known to expect.

I go into the bathroom, poke around in the drawer under the sink, and find the tweezers. I choose a stem at random, one near my left wrist, and pluck it out.

Mary-Mother-of-Jesus-in-a-Bathtub, that hurt.

Read more…