Posts Categorized: Indiana Review Online: an Undergraduate Project

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IR Online Fiction: “The Little Chicken” by Ellen Goff

“The Little Chicken”

by Ellen Goff

No fewer than six chicks came into the world on Jo’s birthday.

Jo would admit she was disappointed. She was turning seven, so she should have gotten seven chickens. But then she reminded herself that hatched eggs were most definitely a gift from God and that she shouldn’t be picky. Maybe God had gotten tired when he got to seven. He had rested on the seventh day anyway. Read more…

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IR Online Fiction: “The Artist” by Robert Julius

“The Artist”

by Robert Julius

I took the usual route home. Passed underneath the 22. Must’ve been a dozen colored tents, tattered and torn, tarps flapping in the Santa Ana winds like they’re a good gust away from sailing to someplace nicer. Maybe someplace with less of a stench, away from the cud and muck and scum and sluts. That ain’t no way of living. That’s what my uncle, the Governor, tells me. And I believe him, for the most part. See, I knew this woman who used to hang out underneath the 22 some weekends. She don’t got a name, or if she does, she wouldn’t tell me because maybe she’s too old to be with someone like me. She’s a nebulous sort of woman, hair all over the place, you know, in the places that matter, and her eyes do this dodgy kind of thing where they look you straight in the soul but not long enough to mean it. But that don’t matter, not according to my uncle the Governor. Read more…

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IR Online Fiction: “Mikey’s Flag Shirts” by Amzie Augusta Dunekacke

“Mikey’s Flag Shirts”

by Amzie Auguta Dunekacke

I don’t like American flag shirts much. Something about them seems gaudy to me, perhaps forced. I mean, I’ve been conditioned for patriotism since preschool taught me to begin every weekday morning with the Pledge of Allegiance. The routine carried on until high school graduation, the same emotionless recitation, the unconscious “One nation under God.” Maybe a red, white, and blue shirt is a more sincere offering of pride. Then again, maybe not. Read more…

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IR Online Editors’ Note


When we began this project, we wanted to give voice to writers we don’t often see in literary journals. In the hyper-competitive world of literary publishing, emerging, undergraduate writers do not always have the opportunity to gain their first footholds. We wanted to help change that.

Although this is the first semester that we have endeavored on such a project, we have had an overwhelming response. We received hundreds of fiction and poetry submissions from around the globe in a very short of period time, and we have been roundly impressed by the quality of work undergraduates are producing. It is through the tremendous support of Indiana Review, Indiana University faculty, and our fellow students that we were able to have the privilege of reading so many great works and publishing the authors here, and we want to express our gratitude for the opportunity. We hope that literary and academic communities will continue to engage undergraduates in all facets of this important work, and we hope you enjoy the pieces in this edition as much as we do.


Fiction Committee Chair

Megan Riner


Fiction Committee

Allison Brown

Rachel Hammond

Brigid Phillips

Cara Trent

Lauren Weidenger


Poetry Committee Chair

Silas Coghill


Poetry Committee

Joe Aronson

Kate Bruni

Mackenzie Clinger

Caroline Hewitt


Social Media and Marketing Committee

Laresa Lund

Cassie Rocks

Torie Schumacher

Kayla Sermershein

Claire Turner


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IR Online Poetry: “Mary Kay” by Meritt Rey Salathe

“Mary Kay”

by Meritt Rey Salathe

vogue gauntly in the neon light of dive
bars. Suck heavy air like
dying carps. Door cracks varnished; slice

of night
light breaking
wildly through alleyways and steampunk
streets. Pink Chardonnay lick
me. Kiss me. Have me. Drain me. Leave

up twenty
flights, or drowsy at the wheel. This
blush Pontiac Vibe has
Four Cylinder Engines and 16”

Steel Wheels
With Bolt on
Covers. Electronic Cruise Control
and 6-way Front Driver
Seat Command. Driver/Front Passenger

if un-punctured. Glorious vessel
of saleswomanship, fly
us heavenward on foundation

sponge wings.
Taste me sun
and body. Smear me like a turquoise
shade. Smack a flush
onto my hollow cheeks. Rev me.


Meritt Rey Salathe studies English at Whitman College and is currently writing a poetry thesis. Her favorite poets include Craig Arnold, for his complicated juxtaposition of the inanimate and sensual, and Marianne Moore, for her brilliant syllabics. In her free time Meritt practices mixology and leads quarterlife, a punchy student-run publication.