Posts Categorized: Poetry

Article Thumbnail

Deadline Extended! 2016 Poetry Prize

Do you need a little more time to polish your poems for our 2016 Poetry Prize, judged by Camille Rankine? Good news: We’ve extended our deadline to April 7, 2016 at midnight EST!

Send your best, and soon. Full contest guidelines can be found here.

We look forward to reading your work!

Camille Rankine’s first book of poetry, Incorrect Merciful OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAImpulses, was recently published from Copper Canyon Press. She is the author of the chapbook Slow Dance with Trip Wire, selected by Cornelius Eady for the Poetry Society of America’s 2010 New York Chapbook Fellowship, and a recipient of a 2010 “Discovery”/Boston Review Poetry Prize. Her poetry has appeared in Atlas Review, American Poet, The Baffler, Boston Review, Denver Quarterly, Gulf Coast, Octopus Magazine, Paper Darts, Phantom Books, A Public Space, Tin House, and elsewhere. She is Assistant Director of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Manhattanville College and lives in New York City.

 

Article Thumbnail

Listen to Sara Brickman Read “Poem for the Men Who Write Poems About Women’s Stories and Make Themselves Look Glorious In the Telling”

 

Sara Brickman’s great poem, “Poem for the Men Who Write Poems About Women’s Stories and Make Themselves Look Glorious In the Telling,” appears in our most recent issue, Indiana Review 37.2, Winter 2015.

Listen to Sara read her poem here.

Sara Brickman is an author, performer, and activist from Ann Arbor, MI.  eyes copyThe winner of the 2015 Split This Rock Poetry Prize, Sara has received grants from 4Culture, a Ken Warfel Fellowship for Poetry in Community, and a Lambda Literary Emerging Writer Fellowship. Recent work appears in Muzzle, Shift, The New, and the anthology Courage: Daring Poems for Gutsy Girls. Her manuscript was a finalist for the 2015 Pamet River Prize from Yes Yes Books. Sara lives and writes in Charlottesville, VA, where she is a Hoyns Fellow and MFA candidate in Poetry at the University of Virginia.

 

Article Thumbnail

Online Feature: “Some Advice for Both of Us” by Keetje Kuipers

 

Just once, let the glossy body lie in its own
tangled grasses. Admit the doors uncoupled
from their latches to allow us through were ones
we shouldered open. This is not the way—

forcing fruit to sugar in our hands. When our mothers
told us to love, they meant that we should wear
warm socks to bed. Look at their beds. If the garden

is not a garden, and if its tiny lamps illuminate only
their own darknesses, we must hold ourselves inside
forever. This is what oceans are for. This is why 2am.
Because now that touch is less of a medicine—less touch.

This poem appeared in Indiana Review 35.1, Winter 2013.

*

30_DSC5432Keetje Kuipers has been the Margery Davis Boyden Wilderness Writing Resident, a Stegner Fellow at Stanford, and the Emerging Writer Lecturer at Gettysburg College. A recipient of the Pushcart Prize, her poems, essays, and fiction have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, including Best American Poetry. Her first book of poetry, Beautiful in the Mouth, won the 2009 A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize and was published by BOA Editions. Her second collection, The Keys to the Jail, was published by BOA in 2014. Keetje is an Assistant Professor at Auburn University where she is Editor of Southern Humanities Review.

Article Thumbnail

Interview with 2015 Poetry Prize Runner-Up Jennifer Givhan

Indiana Review‘s 2016 Poetry Prize is now underway, with submissions open February 15th through April 1st. In celebration, we’ve tapped 2015 Poetry Prize Runner-Up Jennifer Givhan to tell us more about her writing process, sources of inspiration, how she deals with writers block, and advice to future submitters.

*

Jennifer Givhan is the author of the poetry collectionLandscape with Headless Mama, which won the 2015 Pleiades Editors’ Prize. Her work has appeared in Best New Poets 2013, AGNI, The Kenyon Review, Rattle, Columbia Poetry Journal, Prairie Schooner, Indiana Review, and Southern Humanities Review, among over one hundred other publications.

She currently works as Poetry Editor at Tinderbox Poetry Journal and teaches poetry workshops at The Poetry Barn.

Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Microreview: Rickey Laurentiis’s Boy With Thorn

Boy with Thorn by Rickey Laurentiis (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2015)
Review by Yael Massen

Rickey Laurentiis’ debut poetry collection, Boy with Thorn, arrives at a crucial time in American literary discourse, engaging the oppressive and harmful legacies of our nation with clarity and intelligent critique. Laurentiis’ collection as a whole is honest in recognition of a life lived through violence. The reader must praise the landscapes in this collection, in the midst of its terror and destruction, for also producing Laurentiis’ lyric beauty and wisdom. His relentless recognition of personal truths and reclamation of narratives formerly silenced is an example of poetry at its highest form.

Introduced by Terrance Hayes, who selected the collection for the prestigious 2014 Cave Canem Poetry Prize, Boy with Thorn deliberately engages with crises and politics few contemporary poets discuss with self-reflection. In “I Saw I Dreamt Two Men,” the speaker addresses Anti-Homosexuality bills proposed in Nigeria and Uganda with the support of conservative American Christian organizations, as well as recognition of his own inaction: “I stayed with southern silence.”

The silence of the American South is the landscape that haunts this collection. A Louisiana native, Laurentiis returns to the environmental destruction and social dispossession in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in “No Ararat”: “I didn’t dream this. There was a storm. Then there wasn’t. The day after came like a hammer through glass. The sky shook off his clothes and it was brilliant. I tell you it was necessary: Violence had to preface such beauty.” Religion, like the south, is embedded into the geography of the collection. Laurentiis’ speaker is in constant conversation with an ideology that brought him to live “the way a problem lives, openly, so much / earth wanted [him] closed” (“Epitaph on a Stone”).

I was most moved by Laurentiis’ poems that directly engage rape culture, particularly “Black Iris,” a poem that transforms Georgia O’Keeffe’s eponymous painting. Here, Laurentiis crafts narratives and representations of sexuality complicated by violence and trauma formerly silenced and denied by the “Old Masters” (to quote “Vanitas with Negro Boy”) of art and white supremacy.

and when the iris shakes in it,
the lips of the flower shaping
to the thing that invades it, that will be
me, there, shaking, my voice shaking.
like the legs of the calf, who—out of fear?
out of duty? —is sitting by his dead
mother because what else will he do, what else has he?
Because a voice outside him makes him.

The title poem of the collection, “Boy with Thorn,” exemplifies Laurentiis’ technical mastery, social consciousness, fearsome imagination, and self-awareness. The ekphrastic poem transforms a first century B.C.E. bronze sculpture into a meditation on violence and a reclamation of the self in the aftermath of trauma:

                        11.
              I keep thinking of the thorn as
a marker, scrawler, what shapes the places both excused
              and forbidden
in his body’s swamp.

                             12.
          Violence thou shalt want. Violence thou shalt steal
and store inside.

The poem concludes on the speaker’s negotiation of these internalized, external voices.

                        28.
          This was his body, his body
finally his.

                        29.
          He shut the thorn up in his foot, and told his foot
Walk.

Laurentiis’ speaker pronounces a final resolve to inhabit his body as is, with an understanding of the pain that must be managed as a part of its existence.