Posts Categorized: Prizes

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Announcing Our BIG 2015-2016 Indiana Review News!

We’re busy in the Indiana Review offices this summer: Our 2015 1/2K Prize is currently open for your work under 500 words in any genre, and our new Summer 2015 issue was published only weeks ago. We’re also very happy to announce our three exciting new ventures and partnerships!

Indiana Review is thrilled to partner with the excellent Indiana University Press to start our Blue Light Books series, an annual Prize given on alternating years for a short story collection and a poetry collection. From December 1, 2015 to February 15, 2016 we will be accepting submissions of short story collections. The winner will receive $2,000, publication with IU Press, and be flown out to beautiful Bloomington, IN to read at our 2017 Blue Light Reading. This year the prize will be judged by Michael Martone. Read more…

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Announcing Indiana Review/IU Press Blue Light Book Prize!

We at Indiana Review are thrilled to announce Blue Light Books, a new book series partnership with the excellent Indiana University Press. The Blue Light Book Prize will rotate each year between short story and poetry collections. The inaugural Prize, awarded in 2016, will be for a short story collection. The first awarded Prize aims to display a stunning collection of fiction and will be published through IU Press. The winner will be awarded $2,000, publication, be flown out to read at our 2017 Blue Light Reading here in beautiful Bloomington, IN, and will be selected through an anonymous reading by Michael Martone.

The name for the collaboration was inspired by a blue light outside of the Indiana Review offices, which are located at the end of a long hallway. When the office is open, the blue light is turned on. Our annual spring Blue Light Reading has come to symbolize our sense of openness and larger dedication to the literary community, and we are proud to expand this commitment with our Blue Light Books Prize. Read more…

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2015 1/2 K Twitter Contest!

A work of art doesn’t have to be long to be good. Our ½ K prize proves that good stories, much like chicken nuggets, come in all shapes and sizes. Below are thirteen novels and epic poems you might have read, or pretended to have read, at some time or another. We want you to choose one and compress the whole thing into a one-tweet synopsis and send it to us @IndianaReview by July 22. Be sure to use the hashtag #IRHalfKPrize, too, so we’ll see it. Here are your options:

  1. Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
  2. Ulysses by James Joyce
  3. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  4. 1984 by George Orwell
  5. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  6. Inferno by Dante
  7. The Odyssey by Homer
  8. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  9. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  10. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

We’ll retweet the winners and runners-up, and award prizes. Our top choices will also get to see their tweets in a blog post on our website!

Oh, yeah!

The three most gifted literary shrinkers will receive an IR prize pack of our favorite back issues and official IR beer koozies.

WWE Shrinker

Good luck with your compressing! And be sure to submit to Indiana Review’s 2015 ½ K Prize.

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Interview with 2014 1/2 K Prize Winner Amy Woolard

While readying your submission Amy Woolard Headshotto our 2015 1/2 K Prize, read our interview with 2014 winner Amy Woolard. Here she discusses her good friend David Lynch, the absence of poetry in the law, and her experience with returning to writing after a ten-year dry spell.

Amy Woolard is a public policy attorney working on foster care, juvenile justice, poverty, and homelessness issues in Virginia. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the University of Virginia School of Law. Her poems have appeared/are forthcoming in the Virginia Quarterly Review, Ploughshares, Gulf Coast, Court Green, Fence, The Journal, and Best New Poets 2013, among others, while her essays have run on Slate, Pacific Standard, The Rumpus, Indiewire, and elsewhere. She lives in Charlottesville, Va. You can also find her on Twitter @awoo_, and on her website, www.shift7.me.

What was your inspiration for the character of the girl in “The Girl Next Door to the Girl Next Door”?

I’m going to pass the mic to my good friend David Lynch on this one & hope it doesn’t come off as pompous of me:

“It limits it,” Lynch said, when asked why he’s reluctant to talk about his work in detail. “It stops people from intuiting and thinking on their own. Nothing should be added. Nothing should be subtracted. A film, a book, a painting—it’s done, and this is it. There’s a comfort when your ideas are realized. You’ve worked so that all the elements are working together and it feels complete and correct. Then you say it’s done. Then it goes out into the world but it doesn’t need any more explanation. It is what it is. In cinema, cinema is such a beautiful language—as soon as people finish a film, people want you to turn it into words. It’s kind of a sadness—for me, the words are limiting. Whereas this language is the language that you love. The language of cinema. It’s about love, is what it’s about.”

Seriously: I tend to write about two girls in various scenarios. They’re two actual girls at the same time as they are amalgamations. The poem is just a scene I’m shooting of them. It’s also about love. Read more…

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Interview with 2015 1/2K Prize Judge: Kim Chinquee

kimchinqueeOur 2015 1/2K Prize judge is the phenomenal Kim Chinquee, whose excellent story, “Darling,” will appear in The Indiana Review issue 37.2, Winter 2015. Here she discusses her thoughts on short-short work, dealbreakers, and what she might be looking for in the prize-winning entry.

Kim Chinquee is the author of the collections PRETTY, PISTOL, and OH BABY. Her website is www.kimchinquee.com.

 

1) When and how did you start writing short-short work?

I wrote my first flash fiction piece in 2000, in Mary Robison’s workshop at the University of Southern Mississippi’s Center for Writers. It was my second semester as a graduate student. She had asked the students to bring in something short, so I wrote a piece called “Pure Gold,” which I sent to NOON. It was accepted by Diane Williams, and retitled “The Top Shelf.” I continued writing flash fictions, along with longer work, and seem to have better luck with the flashes.

2) We hear a lot about the challenge of “compressing” in short-short work. Can you speak a bit to how you’ve found this to be the case or not, and to any other challenges you encounter in writing?

My biggest challenge is writing longer work. I’ve become so accustomed to writing short work that my internal editor is sometimes hyperactive.  Lately, I’ve been trying to write more, and then scale back, after I can see the work objectively. I find enjoyment in that.

3) “Choo and Rumble” is at once highly specific and vast in its thematic scope and treatment of time. What are some of your thoughts on the responsibility of short-short work at large, or some myths about it that you want to debunk?

I admire senses and scenery in short-short work. And jumps in time and space. More showing, less telling. Sometimes language play. Breaking limits and boundaries. In short-short work, it’s interesting to break the rules.

4) Do you have any hard and fast “dealbreakers” in writing? Any pet peeves?

Ending the piece by saying it’s a dream. Fiction is already a dream, so it takes the dream out of it when a narrator announces to the reader it’s a dream. On the other hand, I think dreams can make interesting stories, and can sometimes add depth to fiction, as long as the narrator doesn’t point out that the “dream” is a dream.

5) What might you be looking for in the prize-winning entry?

Originality. Interesting language, sensory details, themes. And lots of surprises!