Posts Categorized: Uncategorized

Indiana Review Pushcart Nominations

 

We at Indiana Review are thrilled to announce our 2017 Pushcart nominations!

***

“Liam and the Head” / Courtney Bird

“Self-Portrait as First Kiss” / Tiana Clark

“The Ark” / Katie Cortese

“Nothing Before Something” / Kimberly King Parsons

“The Lion and the Beauty Queen” / Brenda Peynado

“Apocalypse Dream Again” / Kristen Steenbeeke

***

Issue 39.2 is coming soon. Look for “Liam and the Head,” “Nothing Before Something,” and “Apocalypse Dream Again” there!

 

 

 

 

Article Thumbnail

2017 Fiction Prize #SpookyIR Twitter Contest Winners!

Indiana Review is proud to announce the winner of our 2017 #SpookyIR Twitter Contest! We received some pretty terrifying tweets and after a careful vote, we chose one winner who will receive an IR prize pack and free entry to our 2017 Fiction Prize.

Join us in congratulating the winner, Paul Williams!

And a hat tip to our runner up, Andrew Moore! He will also be receiving a prize pack in the mail!

Thank you to everyone who participated, look out for more contests in the future, and don’t forget to submit your stories to the 2017 Fiction Prize by October 31st. Have a spooky Halloween!

 

Online Feature: “The Usual Spots” by Ira Sukrungruang

1.

Every morning, the dogs look for Katie in the usual places. When I open the bedroom door, they burst through the house in tongue-wagging hopefulness. Perhaps the one they truly love has returned from whatever mysterious place she disappears to most of the week. I wonder what that place is to them, wonder if they have created a second life for her, where she wakes and loves and pats other dogs. Are these the dreams they have when they snarl and twitch and sometimes howl in their sleep?

The morning always brings hope, and it is a mad dash into her empty office, then a rumble down the basement stairs, and finally a quick peek out the front windows where she would spend time filling birdfeeders or watering the flower beds. Once they have confirmed that she is not back—not yet—they do not despair. Never despair. They rush out the dog door to tend to morning routines, while I fill their bowls with food.

Read more…

Online Feature: Translation from Wild Honey is a Smell of Freedom by Anna Akhmatova

Привольем пахнет дикий мед,

Пыль – солнечным лучом,

иалкою – девичий рот,

А золото – ничем.

Водою пахнет резеда,

И яблоком – любовь.

Но мы узнали навсегда,

Что кровью пахнет только кровь…

*

Wild honey has a scent—of freedom

Dust—a scent of sunshine

And a girl’s mouth—of violets.

 

But gold—nothing.

Water—like mignonette.

And like apple—love.

But we have learned that

 

Blood smells only of blood.

 

1934, Leningrad

*

(translated by Katie Farris and Ilya Kaminsky)

*

This poem appeared in Indiana Review 33.2, Winter 2011.

Anni Liu (Poetry Editor): The equations that make up most of this spare, needle-like poem are ways of knowing. To link the dust to sunshine and the girl’s mouth to violets makes the world more tangible by performing an intimate epistemology. But, as the end of poem suggests, there is a limit to figurative language, especially when it comes to making images from brutality and oppression. I am grateful for this translation that connects us to Akhmatova, giving us the opportunity to sense what she and others of her time had to learn.

*

Anna Akhmatova is considered a major twentieth century Russian poet, author of such recognized works of literature as Requiem and Poem Without a Hero. She was one of few Russian poets of that time who survived Stalin’s Terror, though both of her husbands, and her only son were persecuted.

Katie Farris is the author of BOYSGIRLS (Marick Press) and her fiction has appeared in various journals, including Hayden’s Ferry and Washington Squire. Her translations have appeared in TriQuarterly and Many Mountains Moving. She teaches at San Diego State University.

Ilya Kaminsky is the author of Dancing in Odessa (Tupelo Press). He is also the editor of Ecco Anthology of International Poetry (Harper Collins).

 

Article Thumbnail

Online Feature: “Up in the Trees” by Courtney Zoffness

I can’t sleep. My furnished apartment in Freiburg, Germany, has a TV that broadcasts a single channel, in German, and since I’m too tired to read but too wired to rest, I tune in for half an hour. I speak nicht Deutch—just a little Yiddish—but can still make out the tail-end of a news program on an Auschwitz survivor, replete with images of rawboned prisoners and the eminent entry gate (“Work shall set you free”); a preview for a film called Female Agents in which be-lipsticked vixens gun down unsuspecting Nazis; and the start of a sitcom called Tel Aviv Rendezvous in which a guileless guest shows up at a Shabbat dinner with nonkosher wine.

Read more…