Posts Tagged: contest

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2015 Fiction Prize Twitter Contest!

 

According to Kevin Brockmeier, “The title is the target toward which you hit the arrow of your story.” Well, Indiana Review is giving you the opportunity to test your aim for a shot at some great IR prizes. For this Twitter contest, we’re challenging you to title our story.

And our twitter story is. . .

You were stranded on a desert island with a copy of IR and a newborn piglet. You did the only thing you could do to survive. #IRFictionPrize

To enter this contest, find one of the tweets over at our Twitter account @IndianaReview, “quote retweet” us your most inventive, hilarious, heart-breaking titles to our story. Make sure to include #IRFictionPrize.Twitter Screenshot

Our favorite titles will win free entry to our 2015 1K fiction prize, a grab bag of Indiana Review swag, and a notable mention on our blog! Twitter contest entries are due by October 20, so get to work!

Good luck titling! And don’t forget to submit to our 2015 Fiction Prize judged by the incredible Laura van den Berg. The Prize submission deadline is October 31 at Midnight EST.

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2015 1/2 K Twitter Contest!

A work of art doesn’t have to be long to be good. Our ½ K prize proves that good stories, much like chicken nuggets, come in all shapes and sizes. Below are thirteen novels and epic poems you might have read, or pretended to have read, at some time or another. We want you to choose one and compress the whole thing into a one-tweet synopsis and send it to us @IndianaReview by July 22. Be sure to use the hashtag #IRHalfKPrize, too, so we’ll see it. Here are your options:

  1. Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
  2. Ulysses by James Joyce
  3. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  4. 1984 by George Orwell
  5. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  6. Inferno by Dante
  7. The Odyssey by Homer
  8. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  9. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  10. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

We’ll retweet the winners and runners-up, and award prizes. Our top choices will also get to see their tweets in a blog post on our website!

Oh, yeah!

The three most gifted literary shrinkers will receive an IR prize pack of our favorite back issues and official IR beer koozies.

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Good luck with your compressing! And be sure to submit to Indiana Review’s 2015 ½ K Prize.

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Announcing the 2013 Fiction Prize Winner!

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Judge Claire Messud has selected “Boomerang,” by Summer Wood, as the winner of Indiana Review‘s 2013 Fiction Prize! We received more than 300 short story submissions of impressive quality and range, all of which were read anonymously by our editors. We’re happy to also announce the runner-up and finalists.

Of the finalists,  Ms. Messud writes, “The stories I read were so full of talent, so diverse, so lively and so interesting. The authors’ gifts are so distinct, and each so different. Each of these stories is a winner.”

2013 Indiana Review Fiction Prize Winner

“Boomerang”

Summer Wood

On why she chose Wood’s story, Messud writes:  The story that I’ve chosen as the winner is BOOMERANG: not only is the prose precise, evocative and at times gorgeous, the author manages to move seamlessly between the narrator’s present voice — as an adult gay man in San Francisco — and his childhood experiences. The complexity of the characters and relationships evoked is impressive, and profoundly moving; and this story manages to imbue the narrative with both subtlety and tenderness, when it could, in less adroit hands, have run the risk of cliché.

Runner-Up

“Wolves”

Caitlin O’Neil

Messud:  As runner-up, I’ve chosen WOLVES. Again, it is the resonant richness of character that strikes me most. There are no grand dramas, here, but rather a wise and thoughtful attentiveness to the force of the interior life, and a close attention to detail. The story takes place in the course of an afternoon and evening (with a coda the following morning), but its protagonist’s thoughts and memories give us the delicate outline of an individual and of her life. The prose in this piece is beautifully controlled; the authorial voice is strong and effective; the story, in its simplicity, is haunting. 

Congratulations to our winner and runner-up, whose work will be published in Indiana Review summer 2014 issue. Thank you to everyone who submitted. We truly appreciate your thoughtful and excellent work.

Finalists

Lisa Beebe, “Wildflowers”

Michael Campbell, “What Are You Doing? What Are You Doing Now?”

Gwen E. Kirby, “The Disneyland of Mexico”

Mary McMyne, “Camille”

Amy Rossi, “When I Say I Am Fine, What I Mean Is Empty”

Dominic Russ-Combs, “Manglevine”

 

2013 1/2 K Prize

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It’s summer in Bloomington, the undergraduates have fled, and Editor Katie Moulton and I are doing our best to keep things lively in the office while the rest of the staff is on break.

A couple of notes from our to-do list that we want to pass on to you:

Regular submissions are currently closed.  We will open the gates again on August 1. 

Any electronic or hard-copy submissions received between now and July 31 will be returned unread.

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I know, it is sad.

But wait!  No need to despair!

We will be accepting submissions for the annual Indiana Review ½ K Prize, judged by Dinty Moore, between June 1 and August 1, 2013.

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Yep.  We’re excited too!  Send us your very best 500-word previously unpublished pieces. Prose? Poetry? Prosetry? There are no rules, man! Well, except for these: 

You may submit 3 pieces per entry and you may also submit multiple entries. At $20 per entry, that’s a pretty sweet deal.  If you are submitting online, make sure to pay the entry fee after you have submitted your pieces. Note: You can pay now, but you won’t be able to submit until June 1.

When submitting online make sure to designate your entry as a submission to the 1/2 K Prize.  If you are paying the old-fashioned way please make checks out to Indiana University.

Full submission guidelines can be found here.

Stay tuned to the blog for more updates and summer shenanigans!

 

Behind the Blue Light: How Contests Work

'The way you hear it, is the way you sing it.' Jan Steen, circa 1665.

‘The way you hear it, is the way you sing it.’ Jan Steen, circa 1665.

Huzzah! Indiana Review’s annual poetry prize is open for submissions! You have until April 1 to submit your poetry, but before you do, I thought it my duty as Associate Editor to—lift the velvet rope, pull back the papyrus curtain, turn the glossy cover, lead you by the hand “behind the Blue Light”—reveal How Contests Work.

You submit a packet of three poems to Poetry Contest 2013. What happens next?

Read more…