Posts Tagged: fiction

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Online Feature: “Wolves” by Caitlin O’Neil

The apples taunt her.  She can hear them falling to the ground, thud after thud, footsteps moving closer.  By now, she should have hired men.  She should be putting in ten-hour days, picking the branches clean, sweeping the ground for cider.  Instead Grace watches the trees knit together from neglect, snarling like uncombed hair.

“Open the orchard to pickers,” advises Ruth.  Her silvery hair is wound into a tight knot on her head that makes her look efficient and smart, like she is storing it up there for the winter. “People are crazy for apples this time of year.”

“I could use the money.”  Any money, Grace thinks.

“Paint some signs and see who shows up.  You’ll be surprised.” Of course, Ruth is biased.  Like everyone else in Rutland, Ruth is in on the apple picking, lending a hand at the Rudnick farm over by the lake.

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Blue Room: “In the Skin” by Katie Flynn

Katie Flynn reads from “In the Skin,” and we interview Associate Editor, Essence London, on why she voted for the piece. Listen here for an glimpse of our latest issue and insight into our selection process.

“In the Skin” was originally published in Indiana Review 39.2, Fall 2017.

Thanks to Youtube Audio Library and John Deley for letting us use “Beer Belly Blues.”

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Online Feature: “Cyclops” by Teresa Milbrodt

 

Usually cyclops babies don’t live very long.  This is why you never hear about them, why the cyclops woman is the only one to have reached thirty.  Two people besides her parents know she has just one eye—the family ophthalmologist and the midwife who delivered her in her parents’ bedroom.  Her mother wanted to keep the process as natural as possible, worried about strange things drugs were supposed to do to newborn babies.

The cyclops woman’s father makes her wear a shade, a crescent-shaped sunglasses lens that fits around her head, so the world looks a little dark to her.  Her father’s world is also getting darker.  His glaucoma is worsening and the ophthalmologist says he’ll be blind in a matter of months.  He won’t stop working, though.  At the counter of Drogo’s, the family coffee shop, he explains to customers that his daughter wears the shade because she has a condition that makes her extremely sensitive to light.

I think it’s very becoming, says Cynthia Liss, one of the regulars.  She says the eyes are the most intimate part of the body and the shade lends an air of mystery like Japanese women with their fans.

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Blue Room: “What are you Afraid of?” by Becky Adnot-Haynes

 

In our debut episode of Blue Room, Becky Adnot-Haynes reads the beginning of “What are you Afraid of,” from Indiana Review issue 39.2. Later, we interview Editor-in-Chief, Tessa Yang, on why she selected this piece. Listen here for an glimpse of our latest issue and insight into our selection process.

Thanks to Youtube Audio Library and John Deley for letting us use “Beer Belly Blues.”

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS!

 

Indiana Review Online seeks submissions of poetry, short prose (fiction and non-fiction), and art from undergraduate writers.* Indiana Review, in collaboration with Indiana University-Bloomington’s Literary Editing & Publishing class, will curate an online space for emerging writers and artists from across the country and around the world. We are open to a variety of styles–everything from realism and satire to the supernatural and experimental forms. We feel strongly about representing diverse voices and identities, including young writers of color, immigrants, the LGBTQ+ community, and women. Give us your carefully strange writing: your nature poems and political poems, your dark humor fiction, your personal essays about pop culture, family, fairy tales, etc. We especially encourage previously unpublished authors to submit.

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