Posts Tagged: fiction

Article Thumbnail

Micro-Review: Ann Beattie’s The State We’re In

The State We’re In by Ann Beattie (Scribner 2015)

Reviewed by Anthony Correale

 

Three stories in particular constitute the emotional core of Beattie’s loosely linked story collection. Each takes as its main character seventeen-year old Jocelyn and carries forward the same narrative. They are arranged in the collection like a frame: a Jocelyn story opens the collection, another is located like a support beam in its middle, and a third closes the collection. The middle story, “Endless Rain into a Paper Cup,” is, arguably, the high-point of the collection. Read more…

Article Thumbnail

Listen to Ben Hoffman Read “The Problem of Leaving”

 

Ben Hoffman’s short story, “The Problem of Leaving,” appears in our latest issue of Indiana Review, 37.1 Summer 2015.

Listen to him read his excellent story here.

*

Ben Hoffman

Ben Hoffman’s fiction appears online at American Short Fiction, Granta, Tin House, Zoetrope: All-Story, and elsewhere. He was recently the Carol Houck Smith Fellow at The Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing and is now a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.

Article Thumbnail

Announcing Our 2014 Fiction Prize Winner!

Judge Roxane Gay has selected “The Passuer,” by Erin Lyons, as the winner of Indiana Review‘s 2014 Fiction Prize! Lyons’ story will appear in the 2015 Summer issue of Indiana Review. We received more than 500 submissions, a record number of outstanding quality and variety. All work was read anonymously and closely by our editors. Thanks to all who submitted their work for consideration and made this year’s 2014 Fiction Prize possible.

2014 Indiana Review Fiction Prize Winner:

“The Passeur”

Erin Lyons

Gay has this to say about the winning piece: “The Passeur is a subtle and smart story about what it really looks like when “well meaning” Westerners try to insert themselves into countries with fraught and violent climates. The story artfully reveals, among other things, how good intentions are not nearly enough to solve the very real problems of the world.”

Runner-Up:

“Come Go With Me” by Nora Bonner

Honorable Mentions:

“El Gritón” by Jose Alfaro

“Going Mean” by Dana Diehl

Article Thumbnail

Laura Spence-Ash’s “The Remains”

Lately, my Christmas list consists of a series of subscriptions to lit journals, and this year I was lucky enough to get One Story—and even luckier that the first booklet that landed in my mailbox was Laura Spence-Ash’s “The Remains.” Spence-Ash tells the story of Mrs. Constantine in five distinct sections, from five points-of-view, none of them Mrs. Constantine’s. We meet the main character, in fact, by meeting her corpse, which has been decaying in her half of a Queens duplex for months. One of the remarkable and memorable components of this piece is the care and attention Spence-Ash brings to her choice of characters who fill out the—well, the remains—of Mrs. Constantine.

The cast includes a spectrum of familiarity to the woman, and in that way, a spectrum of peculiarity when we remember that Mrs. Constantine’s remains have gone unnoticed for nearly a year. The police sergeant who discovers her and the reluctant seamstress who used to do her alterations could hardly be blamed for not realizing the woman hasn’t been around in some time. But when Spence-Ash introduces Mrs. Constantine’s next door neighbor, a young mother who admits to herself that she smelled something strange earlier in the year, I began to question my own passivity and the ease with which we can explain away truths that are uncomfortable. Spence-Ash raises the stakes with Bob MacMillan, Mrs. Constantine’s old boss, who called the police when she stopped showing up to work, but has quietly resigned to her absence. In a heartbreaking final section, we meet Mrs. Constantine’s ex-husband, a man who has moved on where the dead woman could not.

“The Remains” captures brief moments and realizations that each of these characters go through, pulling together deft outlines of what the lonely death means for them all, while also constructing a subtle portrait of the deceased. Perhaps my favorite part of this story, however—which I first read in January and think about and re-read regularly—is the little note in Ms. Spence-Ash’s bio which informs us that “this is her first published story.”