Posts Tagged: indiana review

Not Another Bejeweled Journal

christmas bub You have a writer on your gift list and you are at a complete loss about what to get them. Creative people can to be the hardest people to buy for because we artists are just way too particular about what we like and absolutely do not. You want to get something that says “I love you” and “I am interested in your passions.” But WAIT! Here’s a guide to avoiding the pitfalls of buying for a scribe this season.

DON’T:

The Journal. Ever since your writer shared that first sentence to a friend or family member, every one has been incredibly supportive by buying them the most generic gift—the writer’s journal. Although it might be tempting to pick something from that tall wall of journals lining the bookstore, this is the wrong gift for so many reasons.   Writers like to select what they will write on.  We’re picky about our writing environments, and that extends to the page itself. Conditions must be just right. Does your writer prefer a red hardback Moleskine with unlined pages, a $1 college-rule Composition notebook, or the nearest cocktail napkin? Does your writer even write longhand? Chances are, that bejeweled, boxed, and embroidered journal you found on your way out of the checkout of TJ Maxx will just end up re-gifted to a teenage cousin.

The “Special” Pen. Just like their word choice, writers are choosey with their writing gear. Ball-Point vs Gel. Foray vs BIC. Blue vs Green. Plastic vs Metal. Some of us won’t even look at mechanical pencils; others relish in untwisting the body of their fountain pens. Don’t spend hours in Staples only to see that engraved pen with embossed rubber gripping thrown in the corner of your writer’s bedroom in a week. Read the “Do’s” after the jump! Read more…

Spotlight: IR Interns, Summer Edition

interns!Each semester, Indiana Review is lucky enough to take advantage of 3-4 plucky, wide-eyed undergraduate interns who help us with nearly every step of putting together an issue of the journal. From corresponding with contributors and subscribers, performing research, fixing web and technology problems we didn’t even know existed, and being all-around good sports–we simply couldn’t do this without them.

We want to say thanks by introducing you to the team of interns who’s helped shepherd our Winter 2013 issue, starting with the wonderful people who served as Summer 2013 interns: Brittany Brewer, Belle Kim, and Olivia Miller.

Read more after the jump!

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“Middle Space”: Call for Submissions!

AlphaTangoBravo/Adam Baker

Call for Indiana Review’s Special Themed Folio: MIDDLE SPACE

Bending the rules of craft is not a new thing. Bold steps and subtle transformations are how we move forward in literature, in society, and in ourselves. For a special folio in our Summer 2014 issue, we’re seeking work—in both form and content—that blurs genres and breaks down preconceptions, narratives of transgression that make us question our boundaries of what a literary work is and can do.

Keywords to consider and inspire: boundaries, borders, limits, edges, duality, on the verge, transformation, transgression, travel, movement, bodies, collapse, collage, correspondence, collaboration, middle space.

Click through for guidelines and deadlines!

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Interview With 2012 Fiction Prize Winner: CB Anderson

As we enter the final weeks of the 2013 Fiction Contest, many writers are faced with the question: What does it take to win?

Because submitting work can feel a bit like fishing in the dark with your firstborn child as bait, we asked last year’s winner, CB Anderson, to say a few words about her creative process and to share a few strategies for success in short fiction.

Anderson’s prize-winning story “Mavak Tov” will soon be published in her collection River Talk. The book contains 17 stories — a combination of short and short-short fiction forthcoming from C&R Press in 2014 . Be sure to check it out!

In response to “Mavak Tov,” last year’s judge Dana Johnson writes:

This story haunted me. The main character’s longing and desire for comfort, for a place to be, is so powerful and recognizable, as is the conflict and question this story poses, not just for the main character but for all of us: At what price do we achieve comfort? At what point do we reject what is easy and familiar for something far more necessary, which is true agency and power? This essential question is explored through a beautifully rendered relationship between a mother and her daughter and between the wives of one polygamist man, in gorgeous, unflinching detail. Read more…

Interview with Half-K Prize Judge Dinty Moore

Only two weeks remain to submit to Indiana Review’s Half-K Prize Contest! But before you succumb to a series of massive panic attacks that leaves you sitting paralyzed in front of a blank Word document, take a second to gain some insight from this year’s judge, Dinty Moore.

Moore is the author of numerous books including the Grub Street Nonfiction Book Prize Winner Between Panic & Desire, and the editor of Brevity, an online magazine that accepts brief submissions of less than 750 words (sound familiar?).

He answered some of our questions about what makes a compressed story powerful and gripping—like a “cup of coffee five times stronger than the usual.”

Click here to read the entire interview with Moore!
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