Posts Tagged: nonfiction

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43.1 SNEAK PEEK: PANELÁK STORIES by DANIELA KUKRECHTOVÁ

The summer issue of Indiana Review is out now! Here’s a look at an excerpt from Daniela Kukrechtová’s nonfiction piece, “Panelák Stories.”

Nonfiction-Excerpt-for-IR-Wordpress-Post

Read the rest in Indiana Review issue 43.1, available for purchase here.


Daniela Kukrechtová is a Czech/US binational. She is a writer, scholar, and translator. She teaches American literature at Emerson College. Her scholarly work has been published in journals such as African American Review and the CEA Critic. Her poems and translations have appeared in Hollins Critic and CIRCUMFERENCE: Poetry in Translation and her nonfiction in Persephone’s Daughters.

Art by Arghavan Khosravi.

Review – Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction, by Michelle Nijhuis

Reviewed by Laura Dzubay

In a late chapter in Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction, Michelle Nijhuis shares a quote from legal scholar Holly Doremus: “Nature advocates have obtained much of what they have asked for, but they have not asked for what they really want.” The climate crisis has recently begun taking its long overdue place in the spotlight of international concern, and in that context, Doremus’s observation highlights something crucial: that we only have so much time to choose the future we want.

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REVELATORY WIT FOLIO: SPECIAL CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS!

In addition to accepting works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction for General Submissions starting on September 1, Indiana Review is calling for submissions to our Revelatory Wit Folio.

It is truly a delight and, we think, a profound bodily conversation between audience and writer, when that sentence, line, sentiment, finely crafted, brings about a hearty laugh. From Podcasts to Netflix specials, there is seemingly enough material now for us to livelaughlove ourselves to infinity and beyond. Sometimes, though, humor might also prepare us, or open us to, sobering or incisive ideas and dialogues. A guffaw can be a moment of relief, or even pacification, but it may also bring us face to face with our absurd selves or pull back the curtain on the urgencies of our right now. For the Revelatory Wit folio, we are looking for poems, essays, and short stories that can both provoke a laugh and tell us about, or give a new understanding of, our world and ourselves.

REVELATORY WIT FOLIO SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

General and Special Folio Submissions are open from SEPTEMBER 1 until OCTOBER 31 (MIDNIGHT EDT). We will only accept submissions during this submission window.

There is a $3.00 reading fee for all non-subscribing submitters.

To be considered for publication in the Folio, please be sure to select “REVELATORY WIT Folio – appropriate genre” when submitting.

You may only submit to ONE of the following: General Submissions or the Special Folio.

Stories & Nonfiction: We consider prose of up to 6,000 words in length, and we prefer manuscripts that are double-spaced in 12-point font with numbered pages. Submissions should be formatted as .doc files.

Poems: Send only 3-6 poems per submission. Do not send more than 4 poems if longer than 3 pages each.

Translations: We welcome translations across genres. Please ensure you have the rights to the translated piece prior to submitting.

If you have been published in IR, please wait two years before submitting again.

All submitted work must be previously unpublished, which includes works posted to personal blogs, online journals or magazines, or any part of a thesis or dissertation that has been published electronically.

IR cannot consider work (other than book reviews, author interviews, or blog posts) from anyone currently or recently affiliated with Indiana University, which includes those who have studied at or worked for Indiana University within the past 4 years.

We look forward to reading your work! For complete guidelines, click here for our Submissions page.

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2019 1/2 K Prize Winner

Indiana Review is thrilled to announce that the winner of our 1/2 K Prize is Emily Lawson for “Coal Hollow Fire, UT.”

The prize was open to any piece under 500 words. We want to express our appreciation to everyone who submitted and made this year’s prize a success!

2019 1/2 K Winner

“Coal Hollow Fire, UT” by Emily Lawson

“The writer really impressed me with how much was built–nostalgia, regret, danger, intimacy–into this short piece that utilized sparse, beautiful language. There was such a contrast in the icy, distant language that they used while describing something so hot, so dangerous that it made me read it several times.” — Megan Giddings

Finalists

“Autopsy,” “Between Hospital Visiting Hours,” and “I Drop a White Pill in My Sink,” by A.D. Lauren-Abunassar

“How to Make Breakfast” by John Paul Martinez

“hymns to the word” by Carrie Jenkins

“Touch” by Eric Burger

Stay tuned for more prize and submission opportunities.

Nonfiction Feature: “kafir 1 & 2” By Tarfia Faizullah

 

kafir 1

 

It’s been twenty years since my sister died in the car accident. For twenty years I’ve been telling slightly different versions of her death and the aftermath. None of them are true. All of them are true.

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Kufrul-‘Inaad is disbelief out of stubbornness. This applies to someone who knows the truth and admits to knowing the truth, and knows it with his or her tongue, but refuses to accept it and refrains from making a declaration.

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One night during college at a party in someone’s dark dorm room, someone decided it would be fun to make a drinking game out of how many things in common we had with our siblings. The lava lamp in the corner made our faces seem like the topographies of far- away planets. “What about you, Tarfia?” he asked.

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“Throw into hell every obstinate disbeliever,” Allah says a few verses later. “Why are you so stubborn?” everyone in my life who has ever loved me has asked. “Why is it so hard for you to back down?”

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“I don’t have any siblings,” I said, thrumming the amber neck of the beer bottle with my fingers.

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In verse 50:19 of the Qur’an, Allah says to the disbeliever, “And the intoxication of death will bring the truth; that is what you were trying to avoid.”

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“She’s not dead,” I said when my parents came to visit me in the hospital a few days after my sister had gone into cardiac arrest. My arm was in a sling, freshly plastered hours after surgery that was meant to correct the damage done to my shoulder during the car accident. My mother’s face was a map of bruises. I couldn’t look directly at any of the new countries of her ruptured skin. “She can’t be.”

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How can death simultaneously intoxicate and bring truth? If the very cells that allow us to experience intoxication stop functioning, how do our brains process, allow, or deny truth? That is to say, truth is like memory in that it is not so much a set of discrete memories as much as it is a set of processes by which we encode, store, and retrieve information.

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“It’s just me and my sister,” I say to the lipsticked and rouged woman ringing up the bottle of perfume I’m buying for my mother at the makeup counter at Dillard’s. It is strange how easy it is to not continue with “…but she hasn’t been alive for twenty years.” “I’m about five years older,” I say, and she lights up. “That’s the age difference between me and my sister!” she says, and I smile and sign my name on the credit card slip with a flourish.

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In many ways, kufr is synonymous with atheism, which is the rejection of a belief in the existence of deity. But is it still disbelief if you are rejecting belief in someone or something that no longer exists?

 

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