Posts Tagged: nonfiction

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Online Feature: “Disappearing Rabbits” by Anne Owen Shea

There are things your mother will do for you that no one else will: cut crusts off your bread, sew together two soft scraps of cloth to make a blanket for your bed. She will allow you to stay home in the house when you get older because she likes having you around. Mothers want you to be close to them. They buy you gifts, a rabbit that you think is female at first but then turns out to male, a cross necklace for your first communion, a music box with a ballerina on a spring that twists in circle when you wind it up. There is a time in your life when anything is possible and then later on a time when nothing is. Eventually the music box stops playing music, and one of your rabbits disappears. And then you lose track of the box completely; the barbed wire cage becomes home to another rabbit that your parents buy to make you feel better. And then eventually the replacement rabbit disappears and there is just an empty cage, a few tufts of fur in the yard after the dogs run away.
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Listen to “Five Kinds of Dolls” by Amy Blakemore

We are delighted to feature “Five Kinds of Dolls” on the Bluecast! This work of nonfiction appears in the IR 38.2 Winter 2016 issue.

Listen to Amy read “Five Kinds of Dolls” here.

*blakemore-headshot

Amy Victoria Blakemore lives and works in Hartford, CT. Her short story “Previously, Sparrows” was the winner of the 2014 Kenyon Review Short Fiction Prize, and her work has also appeared in PANK, the Susquehanna Review, and Cleaver Magazine. She is a proud alum of the Kenyon and Tin House Summer Workshops. In addition to pursuing a Masters of American Studies at Trinity College, she is currently at work on her first novella. 

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Online Feature: “Dwellings” by Linda Hogan

Not far from where I live is a hill that was cut into by the moving water of a creek. Eroded this way, all that’s left of it is a broken wall of earth that contains old roots and pebbles woven together and exposed. Seen from a distance, it is only a rise of raw earth. But up close it is something wonderful, a small cliff dwelling that looks almost as intricate and well-made as those the Anasazi left behind when they vanished mysteriously centuries ago. This hill is a place that could be the starry skies of night turned inward into the thousand round holes where solitary bees have lived and died. It is a hill of tunneling rooms. At the mouths of some of the excavations, half-circles of clay beetle out like awnings shading a doorway. It is earth that was turned to clay in the mouths of the bees and spit out as they mined deeper into their dwelling places.

This place where the bees reside is at an angle safe from rain. It faces the southern sun. It is a warm and intelligent architecture of memory, learned by whatever memory lives in the blood. Many of the holes still contain the gold husks of dead bees, their faces dry and gone, their flat eyes gazing out from death’s land toward the other uninhabited half of the hill that is across the creek from these catacombs.

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Online Feature: “A Cuban Poet in New York” by Pablo Medina

A Tale of Two Cities

The word of my city is that word from of old.

— Walt Whitman, “Mannahatta”

As a child I fell under the spell of two great cities. Until November of 1960, when we left Cuba for good, Havana was my home. Never gray except in winter when a norther blew through it, it was almost always happy and clear, the antithesis of Dickens’ soulless London or Victor Hugo’s sordid Paris. Havana in those days might have had its terrors and sorrows, but it was, above all, a city of activity and hope. It was, besides, the place that first instilled in me an interest in human beings and sparked a curiosity for the physical world—the sun, the sea, the bay—of which it was so much a part. Read more…

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Metallic Grit: Call for Essays on Craft

As you may know, we are currently reading for the Metallic Grit Special Folio. We think of Metallic Grit as representative of the lasting grit whenever intense work and heat are applied in the creation of a metallic object or being. We believe in this hybridity of writing and want to see your interpretation not only through stories and poems but through craft essays. Show us how writing is resilient, how writing matters not only to you but to the world.

This call for essays on craft and writing as resilience will only be valid for this submission period, deadline October 31st Midnight EST. Please be sure to follow the link here to make your submission.

We look forward to reading your work!