Posts Tagged: prize

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IR Fiction Prize 2016 Twitter Contest!!! #IRrewind

Remember watching VHS tapes rewind? Like when Jack and Rose are alone in freezing waters but are saved by the magically appearing Titanic, which bursts up from the bottom of the sea only to take them back to Southampton. Or like watching the truce between the Montagues and Capulets slowly break apart by the spontaneous re-animations of Romeo and Juliet.

This time, we at Indiana Review are asking for you to not only reverse a story, but also do it in under 140 characters. Take a classic tale and tweet it from finish to start. Remember to always hashtag the title of the work as well as the official hashtag #IRrewind.

Some Examples:

“The story of a jaded boy who leaves his family to go to college and join the fencing team #CatcherintheRye #IRrewind”

 

“A scientist buries different body parts in the cemetery and they all grow into people who live happy lives #Frankenstein #IRrewind”

 

“A teenage wizard is robbed of his magical talent until he must resign himself to living under a family’s stairs #HarryPotter #IRrewind”

 

After the deadline, October 17 @ 12 PM EST, the IR team will pick out our one, favorite rewind, the writer of which will receive free entry into the 2016 Fiction Prize and an IR Prize Pack. While there will only be one winner, we will also be awarding several runner-ups IR Prize Packs as well. This will include the glorious privilege of being re-tweeted and mentioned in future blog posts from Indiana Review.

 

If you aren’t a 90’s kid and can’t remember how to rewind, you can always submit to general submissions or to the 2016 Fiction Prize, judged by the wonderful Aimee Bender! More information can be found on our website: https://indianareview.org/contests/

 

Good luck and remember to be kind and rewind!

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Announcing Our BIG 2015-2016 Indiana Review News!

We’re busy in the Indiana Review offices this summer: Our 2015 1/2K Prize is currently open for your work under 500 words in any genre, and our new Summer 2015 issue was published only weeks ago. We’re also very happy to announce our three exciting new ventures and partnerships!

Indiana Review is thrilled to partner with the excellent Indiana University Press to start our Blue Light Books series, an annual Prize given on alternating years for a short story collection and a poetry collection. From December 1, 2015 to February 15, 2016 we will be accepting submissions of short story collections. The winner will receive $2,000, publication with IU Press, and be flown out to beautiful Bloomington, IN to read at our 2017 Blue Light Reading. This year the prize will be judged by Michael Martone. Read more…

Interview With 2012 Fiction Prize Winner: CB Anderson

As we enter the final weeks of the 2013 Fiction Contest, many writers are faced with the question: What does it take to win?

Because submitting work can feel a bit like fishing in the dark with your firstborn child as bait, we asked last year’s winner, CB Anderson, to say a few words about her creative process and to share a few strategies for success in short fiction.

Anderson’s prize-winning story “Mavak Tov” will soon be published in her collection River Talk. The book contains 17 stories — a combination of short and short-short fiction forthcoming from C&R Press in 2014 . Be sure to check it out!

In response to “Mavak Tov,” last year’s judge Dana Johnson writes:

This story haunted me. The main character’s longing and desire for comfort, for a place to be, is so powerful and recognizable, as is the conflict and question this story poses, not just for the main character but for all of us: At what price do we achieve comfort? At what point do we reject what is easy and familiar for something far more necessary, which is true agency and power? This essential question is explored through a beautifully rendered relationship between a mother and her daughter and between the wives of one polygamist man, in gorgeous, unflinching detail. Read more…

From the Fiction Desk: What Makes a Story Stand Out

Our editor soaking up your submissions in his favorite spot.

Our editor soaking up your submissions in his favorite spot.

Each year Indiana Review receives thousands of story submissions, including hundreds to our annual fiction prize (now open!).  And while there is a range of quality, what surprises me most is the high volume of finely crafted prose. To me, this is evidence of hard work. It is proof that writers are rolling up their sleeves, reading great writing, studying craft, and putting ink to the page. In this field of highly competent entries, what differentiates the stories that make it from submission to publication?

​            In “Three Stories Unlikely to Make it Beyond the Slush,” former Indiana Review Fiction Editor Joe Hiland outlines several attributes that earn stories easy rejections, and he goes on to offer three “types” of stories that often feel too familiar to transcend the slush pile. In “What Editors Want; A Must-Read for Writers Submitting to Literary Magazines” from the The Review Review, Lynne Barrett provides an insider breakdown for anyone interested in submitting to literary journals. Yet even though both articles should be considered essential reading for any fiction writer submitting to Indiana Review, they do little to address what makes a story stand out.

Read more after the jump!

Read more…

Interview with Half-K Prize Judge Dinty Moore

Only two weeks remain to submit to Indiana Review’s Half-K Prize Contest! But before you succumb to a series of massive panic attacks that leaves you sitting paralyzed in front of a blank Word document, take a second to gain some insight from this year’s judge, Dinty Moore.

Moore is the author of numerous books including the Grub Street Nonfiction Book Prize Winner Between Panic & Desire, and the editor of Brevity, an online magazine that accepts brief submissions of less than 750 words (sound familiar?).

He answered some of our questions about what makes a compressed story powerful and gripping—like a “cup of coffee five times stronger than the usual.”

Click here to read the entire interview with Moore!
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